War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0405 Chapter XV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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Third. Those for and during the present war.

Fourth. Those for shorter terms of service.

With much respect, your most obedient servant,

G. A. FOLLEN,

Clerk Adjutant-General's Department.

[Inclosure 2.]

Recapitulation.

1. Those in service beyond the State............... 9,636

2. Those in service within the State...............91,271

30,907

3. Those for and during the war.................... 8,153

4. Those for shorter terms of service..............22,754

30,907

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, A. AND I. General 'S OFFICE, Columbia,

March-, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: In compliance with the requisition of your Department for five regiments of infantry to serve for and during the present war, I have the honor to inform you that a proclamation and orders for the rendezvousing said regiments have been issued by the State authorities and that the troops will soon begin to report in camp. The present camp of rendezvous selected will be at the Lightweight Knot Springs, near Columbia, on the Columbia and Charlotte Railroad.

You say "these troops will be clothed, supplied, and armed on Confederate expense," and "each soldier will receive a bounty of $50," &c. I have to request that you will at once cause the necessary arrangements to be made for the reception of the troops at the camp of rendezvous and for the compliance with the above-quoted stipulations, and to tender you the assistance of this office in the premises.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. R. GIST,

Adjutant and Inspector General of South Carolina.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, March 9, 1862.

Honorable ISAAC W. HAYNE,

Chief Police and Justice:

SIR: After an examination of the land defenses on James Island, I desired Brigadier-General Ripley, commanding Second Military District, to strengthen them in part, and to construct certain other works on the island, and also in the direction of Rantowles Bridge. General Ripley, though appreciating the importance of the work to be done, informs me that it is impossible with the hands now at his disposal to undertake it, and that the difficulty of obtaining a sufficient number will delay it indefinitely.

Regarding the proposed addition as essential to the safety of the city, should the enemy attack in large force, I deem it my duty to ask your