War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0140 COASTS OF S. C., GA., AND MIDDLE AND EAST FLA. Chapter XV.

Search Civil War Official Records

ART. 3. The sick and wounded, under change of the hospital steward of the garrison, to be sent up under a flag of truce to the Confederate lines, and at the same time the men to be allowed to send up any letters they may desire, subject to the inspection of a Federal officer.

Signed this the 11th day of April, 1862, at Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga.

CHAS. H. OLMSTEAD,

Colonel First Vol. Regiment of Georgia, Commanding Fort Pulaski.

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier General Vols., Commanding U. S. Forces, Tybee Island, Ga.

[Indorsement.]

I authorized these terms, subject to your approval.

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General HUNTER.

HDQRS. NORTH'N DIST. DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., April 16, 1862.

MAJOR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of the report of General Viele, giving an account of the operations of the troops under his command at and near Daufuskie Island, as connected with the environment and reduction of Fort Pulaski.

The principal labors of this command, as connected with the bombardment itself, have been already referred to in my report upon that subject, of the 12th instant, as would have been the other matter referred to in General Viele's paper, had it been received before my report was completed.

Although the investment was made more complete and perfect, as I therein stated, by the assistance of the naval forces-by whom, as I learn, the telegraphic communication to Fort Pulaski was destroyed-yet it is undoubted that the formidable operations for the accomplishment of this object on the main line of communication by the two channels of the Savannah River were accomplished by the incessant watchfulness and ardors labors of General Viele's command; and for this purpose there were prepared upon each of two marsh islands-frequently overflowed at the high spring tides-a strong battery of eight or nine guns, or seventeen in all, with the suitable magazines and splinter-proofs to protect the material and men, and in one case, for the proper security of the works, a causeway road was required of over one-half mile in length, for the passage of the ordnance and material, which of itself-with the constructions of the parapets, &c., of the batteries-was a work of extraordinary labor and exposure, and meriting the highest commendation to all the officers and men engaged.

For all the other details of the duties performed by this command, which were of great utility in the prosecution of this investment and siege, I respectfully refer to the report of General Viele himself.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major CHARLES G. HALPINE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South.