War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0872 OPERATIONS IN MD., N. VA., AND W. VA. Chapter XIV.

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They excite my liveliest sympathy, and I have given orders that the troops in the neighborhood of Mathisa Point shall extend to them every facility should an opportunity occur. All persons coming from Maryland are permitted to land, but very few, and those use the pass of the War Department, are permitted to return or visit Maryland.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your excellency's obedient servant,

THE. H. HOLMES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS, NEAR FARR'S CROSS-ROADS, September 22, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT:

SIR: In confirmation of my telegram to you in relation to the detention of cars at Manassas, I respectfully submit a letter from Major Cabell, chief quartermaster, and a note to him from the agent of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

CHIEF QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, September 19, 1861.

Major THOMAS G. RHETT,.

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Potomac;

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram which was received from President Davis by General Johnston, and referred to me.

In reply, I beg leave to state that I received a telegram from Colonel Myers, Quartermaster-General, early this morning, and made the necessary inquiry and issued the necessary orders to have the cars sent down at once. There are no cars detained for storage either at this place or Manassas, nor have I ordered or allowed any cars t be taken for that purpose. No cars of the Central Railroad, from which the complaint originated, I understand from the president of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, have been detained here. There were, so he informs me, but twelve cars at Manassas Junction, and those belonged there, yesterday evening, and the military superintendent of the road was informed of that form Manassas by the agent of the road. I have given this my personal attention,a nd have never permitted cars to be detained here a longer time than it was absolutely necessary to unload them, and I cannot understand why the delays are always attributed to this place. From the best information I can obtain, the delay of the cars is on the western terminus of the Central road, at a place called Millborough, and when investigated it will in my opinion prove correct.

It is impossible to unload a train of cars in an hour, but every exertion is made to unload cars promptly, and to insure a speedy unloading when troops arrive the baggage is always taken and placed on the side of the track before the tents are pitched. I feel confident that an inves-