War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0739 Chapter XIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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An early answer is respectfully solicited, as the police commissioners are anxious to commence the performance of their duties, and as the compensation of the police force is in arrears, and measures should be taken to pay them.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HALL'S HILL, VA., March 9, 1862.

The SECRETARY OF WAR;

In the arrangements for the advance of to-morrow it is impossible to carry into effect the arrangements for the formation of army corps. I am obliged to take groups as I find them and to move them by divisions. I respectfully ask a suspension of the order directing it till the present movement be over.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, March 9, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

I think it is the duty of every officer to obey the President's orders, nor can I see any reason why you should not obey them in present instance. I must therefore decline to suspend them.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, March 9, 1862-9.40 p.m .

General N. P. BANKS,

Charlestown, Va.:

The batteries on the Lower Potomac have been abandoned by the enemy, and it is believed that they either have or are about abandoning Manassas. We have it from different sources. The General Commanding to-morrow morning and feel the enemy. He also directs that you held you whole command ready to move to-morrow morning.

General Dana has been directed to be ready.

R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS, Charlestown, Va., Sunday, March 9-12 p .m.

General C. S. HAMILTON:

GENERAL: Dispatch from headquarters states that batteries on the Lower Potomac are withdrawn, and it is believed that the rebels have abandoned or are about abandoning Manassas.

We are instructed to make a strong reconnaissance towards Winches-