War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0729 Chapter XIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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BALTIMORE, February 27, 1862.

General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN,

Headquarters:

Have this moment received the following dispatch from P. Willard, one of our supervisors of trains at Cumberland: "A man has just arrived here from Patterson' Creek, with the information that the bridge has been fired and was burning when he left." This bridge is within 8 miles of Cumberland, east. We fortunately have timber prepared in the vicinity. As the line is subject to raids, and the maintenance of these structures is most important to military movements as well as to our ability for repairs, pray order military guards on all important bridges west. Notwithstanding the very brief notice, we are much gratified to state that our arrangements are perfecting to accomplish fully your wishes as to movements of batteries, troops, &c. The cars for the service ordered this morning were concentrated through the night at Washington, and we confidently expect these movements to be prompt and effective. We will feel much obliged and relieved if you can telegraph us regarding bridges from Great Cacapon west. Mr. Heskit,, who takes charge of reconstructing bridge at Harper's Ferry, has gone up on mail train; timber is also being unloaded. I trust you can grant him an interview soon after his arrival.

J. W. GARRETT,

President Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

SANDY HOOK, February 27.

J. W. GARRETT,

Esq.:

Will give orders ot secure bridges. Glad to hear that your measures are so effective.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, February 27, 1862.

General R. B. MARCY:

I understand that the General Commanding directs that all the arrangements for transportation of troops from Washington be stopped, and that the movements will not take place until further notice. The General Commanding also telegraph to send back all the troops that have started, which order I have communicated to Mr. Smith, now at Relay, in charge of transportation at that point. Shall the horses and artillery be ordered back? I have directed the trains held, awaiting your instructions regarding the latter.

J. W. GARRETT,

President.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., February 28, 1862-1 p. m.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN:

What do you propose to do with the troops that have crossed the Potomac?

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.