War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0567 Chapter XIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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We have nothing for them but flint-lock muskets or Hall's breechloading rifles, also with flint locks. With this force I should feel safe except from external attack. In case of an advance from the Potomac we should need to be strengthened in some proportion to the number of our assailants.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

POOLESVILLE, MD., August 17, 1861.

Major S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that this command arrived here the day before yesterday. The main body is encamped around the village, while Edwards Ferry, Condrad's Ferry, and the Monocacy are occupied by strong pickets.

Small bodies of the enemy appeared yesterday opposite Edward Ferry and fired on a canal-boat passing down. The fire was returned by the pickets of the Minnesota regiment, without result, I think, on either side.

The Thirty-fourth New York Regiment remains at Seneca. Pickets are thrown out to connect with those of General McCall at Great Falls..

The weather remains most unfavorable for any movements, and the river has risen considerable in consequence of the rains. Fording is now rendered difficult and dangerous.

I have been unable as yet to discover the presence of any large force opposite..

Very respectfully, I am, major, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Numbers 15.

Washington, August 17, 1861.

The Departments of Washington and Northeastern Virginia will be united into one, ot which will be annexed the Valley of the Shenandoah, the whole of Maryland and of Delaware, to be denominated the Department of the Potomac, under Major-General McClellan-headquarters Washington-who will proceed to organize the troops under him into divisions and independent brigades.

By command of Lieutenant-General Scott:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DIVISION OF THE POTOMAC,

Washington, August 18, 1861.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE, U. S. A.:

GENERAL: Your letter of August 17, 10 p. m., has been received. Information received from General Banks to-day confirms the belief that the enemy intends crossing the Potomac in your vicinity and moving on Baltimore or Washington. There are also strong indications of their