War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0486 Chapter XIV. ENGAGEMENT AT DRANESVILLE, VA.

Search Civil War Official Records

having already disappeared but at the same time saw a body of infantry on their right, approaching no doubt for the purpose of flanking us and thus succeeding in taking our battery.

We had then to advance 10 or 15 paces, natural rifle pits, or to fall back and in the thick woods protect ourselves. Choosing the former, I ordered my men forward double-quick, and in a moment they were all well secreted. The number under me was then in a moment they were all well secreted. The number under me was then greatly increased by the sergeant of pioneers bringing his men out and stationing them just by mine, placing them under me was then greatly increased by the sergeant of pioneers bringing his men out and stationing them just by mine, placing them under my command. I then ordered all to fire, which order was so well obeyed that the enemy were instantly thrown into confusion, and after another fire retreated to the woods from which they had just advanced. With the exception of a few adventurers who came outside the woods we saw no more of them for some minutes, but soon they rallied in considerable numbers and engaged us warmly during the remainder of the battle, their balls falling thick around, but no one, I am happy to state, receiving any injury therefrom; our men, in the mean time, under my direction, keeping close under cover and reserving their fire until sure of their mark.

Being cautioned by you to look well to the left, in order to prevent a flank movement by the enemy upon the battery after the charge was made by the others who had joined us during the engagement, to march some distance down the Alexandria turnpike, and there remained until I was satisfied that the enemy had retreated, and then marched back and joined our battalion.

I cannot speak too highly of the coolness and courage of the men whilst under fire, and also of the manner in which Sergt. John Gundy, of the pioneers, and the pioneer corps, performed their duty.

I beg leave to state that some three of my men [Sergeant Gundy, of the pioneers, being one, and Sergeant Gilleland another] went over the field after the action and counted 27 men killed [2 being officers] and 2 wounded of the enemy, all by rifle balls, which, from the position of the forces, could not have been reached by any of the infantry engaged in the action except by those under me.

All behaved well and gallantly, but it becomes my duty, under your instruction, to select a limited number to commend to your special notice for recommendation to the State and National Governments. This is not a pleasing duty, but it must be performed.

For coolness, gallantry, and activity in firing and in obeying orders, I therefore mention: First Sergeant David Farrell, Company B, of battalion; Third Sergeant David Gilleland, Company B, left general guide; Sergeant John Gundy, of Company D, commanding pioneers; Corporal Irvine Miller, Company B; Privates Samuel B. Clawges, W. J. McGinn, John McCann, W. B. Gibson, George Wareham, of Company B, and Pioneers Walter D. Byers and George Kelso, Company B; John W. Waterhouse, Company F; Hugh Barnes, Company K, and Eli J. Ague, and John H. Walker, Company B.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

THOS. McCONNELL,

Captain Company B, Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves.

Colonel J. S. McCALMONT.