War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0476 OPERATIONS IN MD.,N.VA., AND W.VA. Chapter XIV.

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Ninth Infantry, Colonel Jackson, is in my estimation proof enough of the gallantry and discipline of that fine regiment; but where all behave nobly it is difficult to discriminate. I must, however, call your attention more particularly to Brigadier General E. O. C. Ord, commanding Third Brigade, for whose able disposition of his regiments and battery and personal exertions to encourage and urge on his men too much credit cannot be accorded him.

To Captain H. J. Biddle, assistant adjutant-general, of my staff; Lieutenant H. A. Scheetz, aide-de-camp; Captain Clow, brigade commissary, acting aide-de-camp; and Lieutenant E. Beatty, ordnance officer, acting aide-de-camp, my thanks are due for their gallantry in carrying orders under fire and for encouraging and urging on the men, and also to Captain Chandler Hall, brigade quartemaster, who was energetically employed in collecting forage. It is proper to mention that deeming it necessary to leave one of my staff at headquarters to superintend the telegraph and to order forward the reserve, viz, the Second Brigade and three squadrons of cavalry, if required, the lot fell upon my aide-de-camp Lieutenant Elbridge Meconkey, who discharged this responsible duty entirely to my satisfaction.

Seven prisoners were taken.*

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The want of ambulance was felt on this occasion, and I would respectfully suggest that a few more be ordered to each regiment of my division, as I was unable for want of transport to bring from the field all the wounded prisoners taken in the affair. Those left I had placed in comfortable quarters in Dranesville, where they can be well attended to, but owing to this deficiency of transportation for the wounded I was compelled to leave in the hands of the enemy some of my prisoners. Last, not least, I brought in sixteen wagon loads of excellent hay and twenty-two of corn.

The following list of killed and wounded on our side is, I regret, greater than I at first reported, viz, 7 killed and 61 wounded, including 1 lieutenant-colonel and 4 captains, and 3 missing.+

From following list of killed and wounded on our side is, I regret, greater than I at first reported, viz, 7 killed and 61 wounded, including 1 lieutenant-colonel and 4 captains, and 3 missing.+

From what I have gathered from various reliable sources I am satisfied that the loss of the enemy was, at the very least, 90 killed left on the field, besides those carried off, among whom was certainly Colonel Tom Taylor, commanding the First Kentucky Regiment, whom the Kentucky prisoners in my custody state they saw full from his horse. Colonel Forney is also said to have been killed. This, however, is not so satisfactorily ascertained. General Stuart is reported by one of the prisoners to have been killed or wounded.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. McCALL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 28, 1861.

Brigadier General GEORGE A. McCALL,

Commanding Division, Camp Peirpoint, Va.:

GENERAL: I have read your report of the battle of Dranesville, and although no reply is necessary on my part, yet as a citizen of the same

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*Names omitted.

+See report No. 10,p.489.

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