War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0291 Chapter XIV. BALL'S BLUFF AND EDWARDS FERRY, VA.

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Island. Enemy's pickets retired to entrenchments. Report of reconnoitering party not yet received. I have means of crossing 125 men once in ten minutes at each of two points. River falling slowly.

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Numbers 31.

Washington, October 22, 1861.

The major-general commanding, with sincere sorrow, announces to the Army of the Potomac the death of Colonel Edward d. Baker, who fell gloriously in battle on the evening of Monday, the 21st of October, 1861, near Leesburg, Va.

The gallant dead had many titles to honor. At the time of this death he was a member of the United States Senate for Oregon, and it is no injustice to any survivor to say that one of the most eloquent voices in that illustrious body has been silenced by his fall. as a patriot, zealous for the honor and interests of his adopted country, he has been distinguished in two wars, and has now sealed with his blood his devotion to the national flag. Cut off in the fullness of his powers as a statesman, and in the course of a brilliant career as a soldier, while the country mourns his loss, his brothers in arms will envy while lament his fate. He died as a soldier would wish to die, amid the shock of battle, by voice and example animating his men to brave deeds.

The remains of the deceased will be interred in this city with the honors due to his rank, and the funeral arrangements will be ordered by Brigadier General Silas Casey.

As an appropriate mark of respect to the memory of the deceased, the usual badge of military mourning will be worn for the period of thirty days by the officers of the brigade lately under his command.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Numbers 32.

Washington, October 25, 1861.

The major-general commanding the Army of the Potomac desires to offer his thanks, and to express his admiration of their conduct, to the officers and men of the detachments of the Fifteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts, First California, and Tammany regiments, the First U. S. Artillery, and Rhode Island Battery, engaged in the affair of Monday last near Harrison's Island. The gallantry and discipline there displayed deserved a more fortunate result; but situated as these troops were - cut off alike from retreat and re-enforcements, and attacked by an overwhelming force, 5,000 against 1,700 - it was not possible that the issue could have been successful. Under happier auspices such devotion will insure victory. The general commanding feels increased confidence in General Stone's division, and is sure that when they next meet the enemy they will fully retrieve this check, for which they are not accountable.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.