War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0267 Chapter XIV. KANAWHA AND NEW RIVER, W. VA.

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passed up by Fayetteville this morning, and forty-five wagons and five ambulances. Hope soon to receive reply from dispatches of this morning.

[Inclosure Numbers 30.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Camp Gauley Mountain, November 11, 1861.

Yours (Numbers 25) received. Numbers 24 not received. The information asked for about the other roads to fayette and raleigh not received. Retreat spoken of in my Numbers 19 has been reported to you so far as we can see at this side of the river. Had hopes you would be better informed than we were. Our skirmishing last night and this morning was necessary. As I told you, an attempt to dislodge us. We did not draw him in. It will be of on use for you to come in at Nugent's in his front on this side of Cotton Hill, if you can succeed in cutting off his retreat by reaching Fayette or the Raleigh road. That question I asked you this morning; and if I could only know, would be able to give your orders immediately. If that cannot be done cannot be done, then it will be necessary for you to seize the Fayette road at the most convenient point, and push steadily and firmly, taking due precautions against ambuscade. General Cox has now over some 700 men, and they are pushing in towards Cotton Hill quietly. This gives you what information we have. Let me hear from you as soon as possible. In reply to my dispatch Numbers 16, General Schenck just telegraphs me by no means give up crossing Townsend's Ferry, and will telegraph further soon. Should his dispatch confirm plan of crossing Townsend's, you had better come in on the Fayette pike. Cannot find that the enemy has passed Fayette.

If there is any reliance to be placed on our information, Cassidy's Mill would be the strategic point, provided the road is practicable at all. Answer soon.

Brigadier-General BENHAM, Camp, Loop Creek Mouth.

[Inclosure Numbers 31.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Camp Gauley Mountain, November 11, 1861.

Dispatch from our lookout on Bushy Knob above Schenck's says rebels have stopped at Camp Dickerson. If this be so, and local information does not forbid, send about 1,000 men to occupy Cassidy's Mill. Arrange rapid communication with your headquarters. This place, according to our information, is not 5 miles from Fayette, which is 3 miles in rear of their present position. Covering your camp by a strong picket up Loop may at once dispose your troops to move. I only await your report of the practicability of the Cassidy's Mill route to determine whether you are to come in on the north side of Cotton Hill in front of them or take them flank and rear. Look well to the provisions for your troops, and report as soon as you possibly can.

Brigadier-General BENHAM, Camp, Loop Creek Mouth.

[Inclosure Numbers 32.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Camp Gauley Mountain, November 11, 1861.

Dispatches just received from General Schenck confirm previous ones. The enemy is concentrated in camp extending from Dickerson's to near Fayette. Has been throwing up some rail and earth entrenchments.