War of the Rebellion: Serial 005 Page 0209 Chapter XIV. DESCENT UPON ROMNEY, W. VA., ETC.

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fire, but not more than 100 fired, for it was thought that our guns could not reach them, and we did not wish to waste our fire; but from the most reliable information I have been able to gather we wounded 5 and killed 1, omen man receiving three balls. After their cavalry had retreated the commenced firing cannon, and kept in pu for some time, but fortunately, through their bullets and grape flew thick, not one of my men received a scratch.

As a just tribute to my men permit me to say that I did not see cheek blanched or a hand that trembled, and as a further proof of their valid many who, owing to a mistake with our wagons, had not tasted bread for forty-eight hours were in the front ranks in pursuing the enemy to Patterson's Creek.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

A. MONROE,

Colonel One hundred and fourteenth Reg't Virginia Militia.

ANGUS W. McDONALD,

Colonel, Commanding Cavalry, C. S. Army.

P. S.-I had about 350 men to 25th. Since making the above report I learn that some of the men who fired were stationed on the ridge north of Lanier Cooper's house and within less than 300 yards of the enemy.

Numbers 4. Report of Major O. R. Fusten, C. S. Army.

CAMP FUNSTEN, NEAR ROMNEY,

September 28, 1861.

COLONEL: On the night of the 23rd instant, about 11.30 o'clock, out pickets on the Sheetz Mill road from Mechanicsburg Pass came to camp, and informed me that they had been fired upon by a body of cavalry about 2 miles beyond the mouth of the pass, and that they believed that large body of the enemy was advancing towards the pass from that direction. I immediately ordered Captain Sheetz to march his company to the vicinity of the point where the enemy was discovered, to ascertain as far as possible their strength and position, and to skirmish them if they were advancing. I also ordered Captain Myers with his company to Hanging Rock Pass, with similar instructions in case the enemy appeared in that direction. I also ordered Lieutenant Lionberger to take his howitzer to Mechanicsburg Pass, and to hold his other guns in readiness to move. At this time you arrived at camp, and directed me to take Captains Bowen's, Harper's, and Miller's companies, in addition to Captain Sheetz's, and occupy and hold Mechanicsburg Pass..

I proceeded at once to execute this order. Arriving at the head of the pass I met Captain Sheetz, who informed me that the enemy were about half a mile above, but that he was unable, from the nature of the ground, to ascertain with accuracy their strength. i then ordered a strong party of skirmishers, the whole command occupied a very strong point in the pass, with the howitzers supported by the dismounted riflemen, and awaited the approach of the enemy.

In a short time a squad of the enemy's cavalry was driven back by our skirmishers at the head of the pass, which was soon followed by