War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0694 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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my reasons for that opinion. I also expressed my belief that he enemy would make an attempt on Memphis, and suggested that you should get authority from the War Department to order me in that event to your assistance. I stated that I could, if that event happened, fight more effectively for Arkansas east of the Mississippi than anywhere else, for if Memphis fell the mouth of the Arkansas would also fall into the possession of the enemy, and this would be the grates calamity which could befall the State and the army within its borders. I did not wish to convey the impression that I desired, except under the contingency mentioned, to give up this base. If I should do so, I should be forced to seek another not so good in the western part of the State.

I shall devote all my energies to putting this command in fighting order; it needs instruction, organization, and discipline. The State is making efforts to supply clothing, which is much needed.

With high respect, your obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE,

Brigadier-General.

HUMBOLDT, Midnight, September 3, 1861.

Captain BLAKE:

We have been here three hours. The enemy are maneuvering with gunboats and 3,000 men near Columbus, on Missouri side. We have ordered Colonel McCown, who is at Union City, to put his whole force aboard the cars and hold himself in readiness to move at a minute's notice. We start in a few moments for Union City. We are in telegraph office, communicating with Hickman, Columbus, and Union City. Pillow's command is fast arriving at Hickman. We have 2,500 men there now. Send every available company, with provisions, to Union City, to take the place of the once that is leaving. Send a good officer to command them. Also tell Captain Hunt to send up the rifled 32-pounder, with ammunition for it, to Union City. The enemy are reconnoitering with rockets. We will have a fight to-morrow unless they retreat.

Thrasher's company has left here. Had you not better court-martial him, uncles your order him to leave? The commissary and quartermaster must be ready to send supplies to Union City, or to other points via Union City, without one moment's delay.

W. O. WILLIAMS,

Lieutenant, C. S. Army, A. D. C.

RICHMOND, September 4, 1861.

General BEN. MCCULLOCH, Little Rock, Ark.:

I have telegraphed to Governor Rector to send you all the troops at his disposal and to let you have the arms taken off by the troops mustered out of service; and you are authorized to increase your force to such extent and in such manner as you deem proper. Before your dispatch was received we were advised that the Arkansas troops would remain with you.

L. P. WALKER.

LITTLE ROCK, September 4, 1861.

Honorable L. P. WALKER:

Your dispatch received dated to-day, saying. Arkansas troops mustered out of service and taken with them their arms. Such, I regret,