War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0671 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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is all that I can do. I can see no military purpose to be accomplished by my going forward without the co-operation of Hardee; for I could not go beyond Cape Girardeau, and that position is within the line of the enemy, and valueless without advancing farther. I have, therefore, placed the Grampus under the orders of Colonel Borland, t proceed directly to your headquarters, that our policy be at once and as promptly as possible settled by you. I must go forward or fall back. I must better concentrate my forces. In other words, I cannot hold my command in a state of transition. Is it possible for you to come up?

With respect, your obedient servant,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

My opinion is that now to fall back is to give up the cause of Missouri and to let the enemy concentrate his forces upon McCulloch to such an extant as to endanger his position and compel him to fall back, and that it will most probably result in an invasion of Arkansas or the West.

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, August 24, 1861.

ALBERT PIKE, Esq.,

Commissioner of the Confederate States among the Indiana Tribes west of Arkansas:

SIR: In order that there shall be no misunderstanding with the friendly Indians west of Arkansas, this Department is anxious that the article int he treaty made by you, guaranteeing to them right of selecting their won field officers, shall be carried out in good faith. The name of Mr. Garrett will therefore be dropped as colonel of the Creek regiment, and that regiment will proceed to elect its own officers. The regiment being formed among the Seminoles will exercise the same right. Reassure the tribes of the perfect sincerity of this Government toward them.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

CAMP NEAR SPRINGFIELD, MO., August 24, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS:

The Arkansas troops have all the service. Now only 3,000 troops are here. A large force ought to be organized at once. The artillery and small-arms ought not to be moved from the West. We have arms for 3,000 men. More should be sent us, if it is possible. Men for twelve months can be raised in Arkansas. Texas offers fie regiments for the same term. But little can be expected of Missouri. She has no military leader or arms. Answer. Direct to Colonel J. Flournoy, Little Rock, Ark.

BEN. MCCULLOCH,

Brigadier-General.