War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0647 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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river, and he immediately returned, and will advance without delay. I reached here last evening, and have commenced destroying the railroad. I inclose you a letter from General Pillow. I hope we can soon advance far enough to act in conjunction.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CAMP SIKESTON, MO., August 13, 1861.

Brigadier General GIDEON J. PILLOW,

Commanding the Army of Liberation, New Madrid, Mo.:

DEAR SIR: Yours of last evening and note of this morning are at hand. I have sent 150 picked infantry and 100 picked dragoons to drive away the guard and workmen who are repairing the railroad, and, if possible, to destroy the road up to Bird's Point itself. The infantry are Mississippi County men, and know every path to return by if defeated. The dragoons are all swamp men. I expect them to accomplish something important. You ask me to let you know our condition and wants. The fact is that, although my men are in fine spirits, yet we want everything to make them efficient, shoes especially, tin cups, and canteens. I am short several hundred guns, and any you have to spare, never mind how few or many, would be acceptable. If your quartermaster could let me have an assortment of blank books, they would assist me much. Price's dragoons have arrived. I have a number of prisoners (some 20), who should be held as hostages, if for no other purpose. Shall I send them to New Madrid, where they can be used, or to Bloomfield, to the jail?

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CAMP SIKESTON, MO., August 13, 1861.

Brigadier General GIDEON J. PILLOW, New Madrid, Mo.:

DEAR SIR: We succeeded in entirely destroying the long trestle and pile bridges, 7 miles east of here, last night. We cut the ties, threw off the rails, and fired the whole concern, which is still burning, with a picket stationed to keep it burning. I have a hand car here, and therefore have the use of the 7 miles of road. If I had reached here a few hours earlier yesterday, I would have sent my men beyond Charleston to destroy the piling destroyed by your men, which is now nearly repaired. I will reconnoiter that far to-day, and if anything can be done I will have it done. Please appoint a parole system of passes, or something of the kind, for the use of our joint forces. Any communications sent to Mr. Harper can be sent me each hour.

Yours, respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.