War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0645 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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You know I understand the work before me; my prompt obedience to your order to evacuate was the proof of my submission to orders as a soldier, and my embarkation and equally prompt return leaves you no room to doubt my readiness under all circumstances to comply with your orders. Sustain me, and I will keep Fremont so busy that he will never think for a moment of attempting a descent. A movement down the river with less than 40,000 men will never be attempted.

My boats are all gone below. I do my work so promptly that your orders do not reach me in time. I discharged all my boats last night and early this morning. Send up Bowen at once. I will leave the moment my transportation reaches me. Thompson had a brush with the Dutch at Hamburg to-day, and cut them up and dispersed them, killing 1, wounding mortally 5 others, taking 25 horses and 5 guns.

GID. J. PILLOW,

General, Commanding.

NEW MADRID, August 12, 1861.

[General POLK:]

GENERAL: My forces have all returned except the Howard. She will probably be up to-day. One man fell overboard last night and was lost; this is the only accident or loss of any kind incident to the embarkation and return here under the order for evacuation. I have this morning sent my chief of engineers down to the plank road to make a careful examination of the bridges on it, so that I may know its character. It is 132 miles on that route and 70 miles on the route by Benton to Jackson, that being the point of junction with Hardee. On the latter road I can pass Girardeau and all the enemy's positions, and unite with Hardee. It is important that I have my transports hurried up as rapidly as possible, that I may have the train properly organized for the forward movement. I wish to be ready to move by Saturday. I have to-day forwarded a dispatch to Hardee, for the purpose of fixing place and time of union of our forces. If there are any shoes or clothing in Memphis ready, please have them sent forward. I am much in need of two or three traveling forges and horseshoe iron and large quantity of horseshoe nails. Please order me forward a supply at once. I need Pitts and Flackler with me, and Dr. Newnon, very much. Let them join me. I need one more regiment of infantry very much, and ought to have it. I have so many men sick with measles and other diseases, that when they are all sent back my force is very small for the work to be done. You might bring regiment from Union City to supply place of Neely's. I could arm a good company of infantry if I had it here. You might send me an unarmed company of Bowen's regiment and I could arm it, and when the campaign is through I could restore it. I was anxious to have had with me Captain Bethell's company of Freeman's regiment. He is my brother's son-in-law, raised his company to be with me, and at my request, and is very anxious to join me temporarily. I will keep you advised of everything until I leave. I shall keep the Grampus here until I leave for duty above, &c.

Your friend,

GID. J. PILLOW,

General, Commanding.

I of course accept and am on duty under the commission by Confederate Government, but I have not done so formally.