War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0622 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T.

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of my courier of yesterday. I have information supposed to be reliable, that the enemy have called in all their outposts, and, if so, the strike at Hamburg would amount to nothing. If, however, you have sent me any guns, we will go and occupy their fort, and make a depot for supplies there. As soon as Captain Byrne returns, I will issue the proper orders for the conduct of this brigade and start for your headquarters.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT, MO., S. G.,

Bloomfield, Mo., July 30, 1861-9 p.m.

Major General GIDEON J. PILLOW, New Madrid, Mo.:

DEAR SIR: I find it to be impossible for me to go to your camp to-night, as I promised this morning. A courier reports 400 Dutch at Greenville, and as they may be laying a trap for my Ripley County battalion, I must move to their support. The different departments in my division are yet in an embryo state, and my orders may all miscarry, unless I am about, to correct mistakes. I will go to you the moment I think I can leave my men in order, and, in the mean time, you can lay out the plan of the campaign with the light and talents you have around you, and you will find me ever ready to submit to your superior age, experience, and judgment. I am working for the cause, and am willing to work in any kind of harness, and in any part of the team, so you do not tie me behind the wagons. I hope to have the pleasure of seeing you very shortly, and in the mean time consider me subject to your orders in everything.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-Not having heard from you to-night, I will defer my march on Hamburg.

HEADQUARTERS McCULLOCH'S BRIGADE,

Camp near Cassville, Mo., July 30, 1861.

Honorable L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I am now at this place with my command on my way to Springfield. Since my communication of the 18th I have been busily engaged in preparing my force for a forward march, and have also been urging on the commanders of the different forces near me to be ready to co-operate with me.

By furnishing the Missouri force with all the ammunition I could spare, and also what could be spared from General Pearce's command, I have given them sufficient to warrant them in again taking the field. General Price, with his force of between 9,000 and 10,000 men, is encamped around Cassville. His effective force will hardly reach 7,000, and they are nearly all armed with shot-guns and common rifles. General Pearce, of Arkansas, is within 10 miles of Cassville with his command of 2,500 men. His infantry is well armed. My brigade is also near me amounting to about 3,200 nearly all well armed. I shall