War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0588 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

Search Civil War Official Records

There are very few arms in the Indian Territory, and I am continually applied to for a supply. I hope a supply will be sent at once. It is absolutely necessary for the success of my mission to have an ample supply to arm the Indian regiments, particularly the Cherokees.

The control of this post is necessary, and if it has been turned over by the State to the Government of the Confederate States, I hope you mill at once authorize me to take possession of it and all public property in it.

I have the honor to be, sir, obedient servant,

BEN. McCULLOCH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HELENA, ARK., May 29, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

Ten companies ready on June 1 for McCulloch's command. Five are lost if ordered elsewhere. Will dismiss them all fill up before June 15 immediately provided here with money to buy subsistence, and authorized to muster companies in as they arrive, and send them to Virginia with promise of rifles there. I prefer Virginia. If ordered to Fort Smith, must have subsistence and transportation from here. Have no money. Can get it here. If ordered there, can't you send blankets for men, blue jeans for their shirts and pants, and swords for officers, and stop pay to cover costs? All much needed. Can't get them in the Southwest. State authorities refuse arms of any kind, retaining them for militia. Answer.

T. C. HINDMAN.

NEW ORLEANS, May 31, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President Confederate States, Richmond, Va.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of letter received this morning from Lieutenant-Colonel Hyams, of the Third Regiment Louisiana Volunteers, which left this place on the 20th instant for their destination, Fort Smith. I beg leave to call the attention of your excellency to the matters therein set forth. A deputation from the Creeks passed through this place on the 25th instant en route to Montgomery, and will, I presume, now continue their journey to Richmond.

I must also repeat what I have already telegraphed to the Secretary of War, that our Fourth Regiment has not received marching orders, and the Fifth and Sixth Regiments are and have been awaiting the action of Lieutenant Phifer to receive them into Confederate service, who is without orders for that purpose.

I must also, at the risk of being thought importunate and trouble-some, call your excellency's attention to the necessity of a more complete and extended system of defenses for the coast of this State than has yet been made or commenced.

General Twiggs assumed command of this district this morning, with whom I shall be most happy to co-operate in any measures which the public exigencies may require.

I am, very respectfully, your excellency's obedient servant,

THO. O. MOORE,

Governor.