War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0571 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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arms, and clothing. The latter two are deficient both in quantity and quality. This post has been carried on so long without funds in the quartermaster's department, that clothing can be procured at current cash rates, and not at all except with difficulty. I would urge the necessity of sending a supply of funds for the use of this post soon. I think also that the interest of the service demands that a regular quartermaster be sent here.

I have under my command two gunboats, one of which remains at Mound City, to guard the new boats being built there, the other here.

I shall hope to have ready by to-morrow a monthly report, showing the exact condition of my whole command, and accompanied by reports of the various departments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Cairo, Ill., November 16, 1861.

General S. R. CURTIS,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Several have come to this post with safe-conduct through, signed by yourself. I regret this, as one of the most exposed posts in the Army at this time, and would much prefer that the number sent South should be made as limited as possible or be sent by some other route. Although I shall accommodate, whenever it seems to me consistent with the interest of the public service, I shall in future exercise my own judgment about passing persons through my lines, unless the authority comes from a senior, and one who exercises a command over me.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Cairo, November 17, 1861.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Inclosed herewith I send you a letter just received from Cape Girardeau, which fully explains itself.* I have also been called upon to-day by a lady from Bloomfield, who states that the Union people of that district are not only depredated upon, but their lives are constantly in danger. Many have already been murdered for entertaining Union sentiments, and people of this class are not permitted to leave on pain of death. She urges in behalf of the Union people that troops be sent there either to garrison the place permanently or for a started period, giving the citizens notice of the length of time they intend remaining, so that they might take advantage of their protection to get away.

Bloomfield is geographically a commanding position, and if troops could be spared, I would earnestly recommend the occupation of it.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

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* Not found.

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