War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0557 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I shall make this evening a requisition on the quartermaster in Saint Louis for 8,000 bed-sacks. They are highly essential for the comfort and health of the men, and I hope the commander of the department will order their immediate delivery.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., October 30, 1861-1 a.m.

Major General D. HUNTER, U. S. A.,

Commanding First Division, en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by the commanding general to inform you that the has received information that the rebel army is marching directly on this place. He therefore orders that you march immediately to join him at this place with your command, and that it will require your utmost exertions to reach him in time to aid with your troops.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Same to Generals Pope, McKinstry, Sturgis, and Lane.]

SPRINGFIELD, MO., October 30, 1861.

Major General D. HUNTER, U. S. A.,

Commanding Division U. S. Forces, en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to request you to notify him by return express of your present position and what place you are likely to reach with your division, say two days from your present camp. The general is waiting for the divisions to come up to attack the enemy, and desires to hear from you daily, supposing that each day you change your position, that he may know at what time he can depend upon the concentration of his whole force.

If Colonel Webb is near you, General Fremont desires you to order him forward immediately.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

ROLLA, MO., October 30, 1861.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: A messenger came in last night from General Fremont. Left Bolivar Monday night. Hunter was at Bolivar and General Fremont at Springfield. Price reported at Cowskin Prairie. Passed a large number of deserters from Price's army between here and Lebanon. Colonel Freeman is camped 17 miles north of Houston. Snubbs has joined him, making his force 800. His pickets are 20 miles north of Little Piney. They are using every exertion to recruit in Texas, Douglas, Wright, and adjoining counties, and with considerable success. This is reliable, by word brought in by my own scouts, and corroborated by all who come from that section of the country.

Freeman's men are mounted and armed with shot-guns and rifles.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE,

Colonel, Commanding Post.