War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0486 OPERATIONS IN MO., AKR., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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fiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes, "approved August 6, 1861, and that said act be published at length with this order.

Your obedient servant,

A. LINCOLN.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Cairo, Ill., September 11, 1861.

Major General JOHN C. FREMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Since my report of last night nothing has transpired of note, except the information that re-enforcements to the number of about 5,000 men arrived at Columbus last night. About that number crossed to the Missouri shore. The rebels have not shown themselves as far up the river to-day as yesterday. To-day a soldier, representing himself as a member of Colonel Bowen's regiment, deserted, and succeeded in reaching our gunboats. He states that he is from Wisconsin, emigrated to Southern Missouri last year, and when our difficulties broken out was pressed into service. He says that Jeff. Thompson's forces, about 2,600 men (700 of them cavalry), occupy ground opposite Columbus. They are badly armed and clothed. Last night 5,000 men from Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee arrived, and about an equal number crossed to the Missouri shore. These troops are represented as well clothed and armed. Provisions, blankets, clothing, ammunition, and arms are plenty in their camp thinks most of their pork is obtained from Ohio. Heared the officers talk of attacking Bird's Point and Cairo at times; then again of awaiting an attack where they are. Are throwing up breastworks along the whole front of Columbus. They are represented to have thirty-five to forty pieces of artillery (a portion rifled) and six or seven siege pieces in position, and more on the ground ready to put up. In Colonel Bowen's regiment there are quite a number of Northern men, who are not there from choice, but only await an action to turn on their officers and leave the Southern Confederacy forever.

I would respectfully urge the necessity of having clothing of almost every description, particularly shoes, blankets, and shirts, forwarded here as soon as possible. Tents also are required. Cavalry is much needed; also cavalry equipments for the troops here and more batteries of light artillery. All the re-enforcements that can be spared for this post, of every arm of service, would be welcome. There are two companies of the Seventh Iowa Regiment now stationed at Potosi, Mo.; the balance of the regiment here. I would recommend that they be relieved and sent to their regiment.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

BROOKFIELD, September 11, 1861.

Major General JOHN C. FREMONT:

I have command of this post some days, but must have four pieces of artillery if I hold it much longer. The rebels are concentrating around in every direction, and I know we will be attacked before long. This post and stores and round-house must be held. Over 200 of my command are aiding to build the Platte Bridge, near Saint Joseph. No communication with General Pope since he has been on the road. Fifteen hundred of Green's forces commenced crossing the river about Glasgow yesterday, 45 miles from here.

W. JAS. MORGAN,

Colonel.