War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0476 OPERATIONS IN MO., AKR., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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not arrive until 10 a. m. The artillery and cavalry have not yet arrived. There appears to be some difficulty ahead, and I fear the track is torn up and the bridges destroyed. An engine started last night to bring some cars down from a point 90 miles distant and has not yet returned; also the freight train due from above at 4 p. m. to-day has not been heard from. Mr. gamble (the railroad agent here) informs me that we have been expected on this road for the last three days, and he is of opinion that the bridges have been destroyed; he is confirmed in this opinion by the circumstance that if an ordinary accident had a happened to these trains a hand ca would have been sent in bring the intelligence.

This letter will not go out until 11 p. m., so that if you receive it at all you will know that no down trains have arrived up to that hour, for otherwise I should not send it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

P. S.-I forgot to mention that a Major Krekel, of the Home guards, started north this morning with his force, taking one engine and eighteen of the cars intended for the troops of my command. by what authority he is acting does not appear, but by so doing he has delayed our starting somewhat, and, indeed, he may be interfering with the trains now due.

HEADQUARTERS,

Saint Charles, Mo., September 7, 1861-11.30 p. m.

Major I. C. WOODS, Department Headquarters:

MAJOR: Your letter is just received. We have been delayed here, which my previous letter will explain. Green is evidently falling down to Mexico, with a view to destroy the bridges at that point. the two regiments will start at daylight, and in view of the present condition of things will order them to take position at the most advanced bridge and hold it until we can get the cavalry and artillery up. They have not yet reached this point.

Respectfully, &c.,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 7, 1861.

Brigadier General U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

Six 8-inch columbiads and ten 32-pounder guns, with barbette carriages, left Pittsburg for Cairo on two special trains-the first last night, the second at noon to-day. One regiment from this place should arrive at 8 o'clock to-morrow. A boat sent to take regiment from opposite Commerce to Cairo. Other re-enforcements will follow to-morrow. General Smith must throw up earth works and plant guns at Paducah, but make no advance. He should occupy Smithland with four companies, if they can be spared. At least one gunboat should be kept at Paducah. The work at Fort Holt must immediately be commenced with all the laborers at Cairo and Brid's Point. The place should be strongly guarded, and advance guard pushed across Caney Creek, and the heights commanding Fort Jefferson and Blandville should be occupied. Crossing at Norfolk and Belmont watched.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.