War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0474 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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Captain Schwartz's full battery, under the command of the first Lieutenant.

Your main endeavor will be to cut off the enemy from the road leading to Shelbyville, and generally to render impossible the dispersion of his forces by squads, and to annihilate the gang of rebels as a whole.

As the communication between you and General Pope will be subject to the constant hazard of interruption, you will report as often as necessary by telegraph to headquarters, whence dispatches can be sent to him.

I inclose a copy of the order addressed to Brigadier-General Pope.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HUNNEWELL, MO., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FREMONT:

The road is now open. Train went west this afternoon. Leave 1,500 men here, and make night march against Green with 1,600 men and four pieces of artillery. You will not hear from me before late to-morrow.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General.

JEFFERSON BARRACKS, MO., September 7, 1861.

Major J. H. EATON:

The union of cavalry and infantry was all right at Sulphur Springs at 7.30 o'clock last night. It moved forward as directed, effectually preventing the news preceding it. I directed telegraphic reports from this post to execute my order, to assume command at Camp Benton, and direct dispatches from Sulphur Springs to be forwarded to you and I also.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Brigadier-General.

CAIRO, ILL., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FREMONT:

Further reports render it morally certain, in my opinion, that the enemy under Polk is about 6,000 strong at Columbus; that yesterday their heavy cannon were lying on the ground under the bluff, and that Thompson, with an additional force, was encamped opposite [in] Missouri. The account is that the force at Columbus is from Union City and Madrid, and this is poorly equipped.

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Brigadier-General.

CAIRO, ILL., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FREMONT:

Information received since my last, which I believe to be true: Pillow and Jeff. Thompson are now at Columbus, with a force of 8,000 or 10,000 men, perhaps more, and are fortifying the heights there.

JOHN A. McMCLERNAND,

Brigadier-General.