War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0430 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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[Inclosure.]

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

August 6, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT:

SIR: An invasion of the State of Missouri by troops under the command of General McCulloch has taken place. Other invasions of that State are threatened by troops from the State of Arkansas and Tennessee. We recommend you receive into the service of the United States from the State of Missouri troops to serve for six months, to be employed in preserving peace and quiet in that State and to repel the threatened invasions, and also to remove the seat of war from among the people of that State to the southward; to invade Arkansas, and to keep the Indians west of that State in subjection.

If this suggestion shall be adopted, we recommend 5,000 stand of improved arms, in addition to those already sent to Missouri, be forthwith sent, with a proper supply of clothing, camp and tent equipage, ammunition, and means with which to obtain commissary and other quartermaster supplies, and also medical supplies, & c. Arms for cavalry and equipments should also be furnished for a battalion or regiment of mounted men to be raised in Southwest Missouri, in addition to the arms before mentioned. Arms will be needed when Arkansas shall be invaded to arm men of that State who are Union men, and willing to enter the military service of the United States.

The munitions of war we have mentioned we think should be sent to Springfield, Mo., for use at that point and its vicinity.

JOHN S. PHELPS.

FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.

AUGUST 8, 1861 - morning.

Brigadier-General GRANT,

Charged with the Command of the Ironton Force:

A special train will be sent to take up your regiment to Jefferson Barracks this morning at 9 o'clock. You are directed to proceed with it to Piplot Knob, and take command of the force stationed there under Colonels Brown, Hecker, and Bland. You will find at the post an officer of Engineers, Major Kraut, engaged in laying out entrenchments, which you are requested to push forward with all possible rapidity, employing for this purpose whatever number of men Major Kraut may judge as practicable to use advantageously. It is intended to so strengthen the frontier as to make it tenable against any force likely to be brought against it, and to this end additional men and stores will be immediately sent forward. To aid in the works, two companies of the engineer regiments will be sent forward to-day, together with four heavy barbette guns. No lighter guns are at this moment disposable. No enemy is reported as advancing with the intention of turning your position and breaking up your communication with Saint Louis by destroying the railroads in your rear. You are to scour the country in advance as far as your means will allow, keeping a watchful eye upon the approach by Fredericktown, and informing yourself immediately of intended movements by employing reliable spies, agreeably to the instructions of yesterday's date addressed to Colonel B. Gratz Brown. You are to prepare for the contingency of a sudden movement with the