War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0414 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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into camp are armed except the cavalry, decidedly the most effective on the border. For want of better, I shall arm them with muskets as far as I can.

I have ordered into camp on the line between Taylor and Ringgold Counties two companies for thirty days, unless sooner ordered to disband, as you may direct. I will keep out scouts for the next ten days in the vicinity where danger will be most likely to occur. I will be ready to strike at a moment's notice. If I am convinced that matters are settled, I will in less than two weeks strike camp.

By that time I am of the opinion we shall be able to determine, with some degree of certainty, the shape things will assume at the strong secession holds. There has been a settled understanding among the secessionists throughout Missouri to strike a blow simultaneously with Governor Jackson, who is operating in the southern portion of the State. I will report to you as often as I can my proceedings.

The principal design of the secessionists in the northern portion of the State is to keep up the excitement as much as possible, to divert attention from Jackson's operations, while they will do all in their power to harass the Union men in both States. They will not come to a regular engagement. In Gentry County alone they will number at least 1,000, who are continually on the tramp, day and night, skulking in the bush.

We have derived a great deal of authentic information through our scouts, who have penetrated their camps and councils, coming in upon them from the southeast and passing for secessionists.

The 300 muskets have just arrived.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN EDWARDS,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Honorable O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind.:

SIR: The general accepts the six regiments of Indiana troops that you offer. He will order them on as soon as his arrangements for receiving them are perfected.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Honorable RICHARD YATES, Governor of Illinois, Springfield, Ill.:

SIR: The general desires me to inform you that he will accept all the regiments from your State (23 in number), and prefers to equip them himself. They will be ordered to this city, or to a camp of instruction in this State, as soon as arrangements can be made for quartering or encamping them. In the mean time he requests that you will make arrangements for subsisting them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.