War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0377 Chapter X. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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required to complete its outfit, but it is hoped that these articles will soon be furnished.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST,

Saint Louis, Mo., May 29, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the General-in-Chief, that I have ordered two of the four companies of the First Cavalry, now at Fort Wise, to proceed with as little delay as practicable to Fort Kentucky. In view of the large amount of public property at Fort Kearney, and for the purpose of effectually holding in check the Indians in its vicinity, it has seemed to me very important that its garrison, which consists at present of a single company of dragons, should be re-enforced as soon as possible.

I have also directed Lieutenant-Colonel Sedgwick, Second Cavalry, now at Fort Wise, to repair to Fort Leavenworth and there await further orders, presuming that before he can reach Leavenworth instructions will have been issued requiring his presence with the regiment to which he has recently been promoted.

I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 29, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that by the course pursued in this State, under the instructions from the War Department, Missouri is rapidly becoming tranquilized, and I am convinced that by pursuing the course I have thus far, which is fully indicated in my former communications to you, peace and confidence in the ability of the Government to maintain its authority will be fully and permanently restored. Interference by unauthorized parties as to the course I shall pursue can alone prevent the realization of these hopes, and although the policy they might inaugurate might be more brilliant in a military point of view, and far more expensive to carry out, it could not secure the results the Government seeks, viz: The maintenance of the loyalty now fully aroused in the State and her firm security in the Union.

I entertain the conviction that the agreement between myself and General Price will be carried out in good faith, but while entertaining this belief I shall watch carefully the movements of the State authorities. I have reliable means of obtaining information of their movements, and any violation of their pledge and any attempt at rebellion will be promptly met and put down.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.