War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0177 Chapter X. SIEGE OF LEXINGTON, MO.

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attack Georgetown. Do so, and do not delay at all with a view to relieve Lexington. Exercise your judgment. Send dispatches frequently.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

JEFFERSON CITY, September 17, 1861.

Send forward troops and supplies, and let me move forward to Georgetown and get in rear of enemy. If General Pope sustains lexington, a move of this kind is all that is now required. I am determined to move in four days. I have this place so entrenched that a small force will suffice to hold it.

JEFF. C. DAVIS,

Colonel.

General JOHN C. FREMONT.

JEFFERSON CITY, September 18, 1861.

News just arrived from Lexington, probably reliable. The fight commenced on Monday; was very severe all day. Price assaulted the works, and was repulsed with heavy loss. On yesterday morning the fighting was very feeble. When courier left Lane was marching for Lexington, and was at Johnstown on Monday morning. The rebel loss is reported at 4,000; ours at 800. This is evidently exaggerated.

JEFF. C. DAVIS.

General JOHN C. FREMONT.

JEFFERSON CITY, September 18, 1861.

Positive news from Lexington Sunday evening. Main attack had not been made. I have sent two regiments to Arrow Rock, with orders to take post in a day or two opposite Glasgow. Sent a regiment to Syracuse last evening. Will send more to Booneville. Forward harness and wagons; can't do anything with mules without them.

JEFF. C. DAVIS,

Colonel, Commanding.

Major-General FREMONT.

SAINT LOUIS, September 18, 1861.

Acting Brigadier General JEFFERSON C. DAVIS,

Commanding at Jefferson City, Mo.:

SIR: You are hereby directed to increase you forces at the crossing of the Pacific Railroad over La Mine Creek to the number of 5,000, adding artillery and cavalry, according to your judgment, and march upon the enemy stationed at Gerogetown. All the information received at these headquarters leads to the conclusion that the force of the rebels at that place does not amount to more than from 3,000 to 4,000 men, of whom most are poorly armed, and over whom victory may be certainly anticipated. You will therefore, after putting them to flight, take, with your main body, the towards Lexington, directing your cavalry to pursue the enemy some miles on their line of retreat towards Warrensburg,

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