War of the Rebellion: Serial 003 Page 0048 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter X.

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by which my force will be reduced to about 3,500 men, badly clothed and without a prospect of supplies. Prudence seems now to indicate the necessity of withdrawing, if possible, from the country, and falling upon either Saint Louis or Kansas. Saint Louis via Rolla will most likely be selected, with a view to re-enforcements and supplies. My forces are now nearly as follows, which I make up from recollection, not having returns for some time past, in consequence of the troops having been scattered around in the vicinity of Springfield:

First Brigade, Major Sturgis'.

Four companies cavalry ............................... 250

Four companies First U. S. Infantry (Plummer's) ...... 350

Two companies Second Missouri Volunteers ............. 200

One company artillery (Captain Totten's battery)..... 84

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884

Second brigade, Sigel's.

Third Missouri Volunteers ............................ 700

Fifth Missouri Volunteers ............................ 600

Second Artillery (battery) ........................... 120

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1,420

Third Brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews'.

First Missouri Volunteers ............................ 900

Four companies infantry (regulars) ................... 300

One battery artillery ................................ 64

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2,300

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Grand total ........................................... 5,868

I have made every exertion to ascertain the enemy's forces, and though this is very difficult, I am satisfied it will reach 15,000, and in an attempt to surround and cut me off there may be gathered 20,000, most of whom will be ill-conditioned troops, collected from Missouri and Arkansas, with such fire-arms as each man may have, and being mounted, have the means of threatening and annoying my command. In addition to the above will be of the enemy's forces the organized forces of McCulloch, of Texas, supposed to be 4,000, well-armed, and prepared for effective service.

In fact, I am under the painful necessity of retreating, and can at most only hop to make my retreat good. I am in too great hast to explain at length more fully. I have given timely notice of my danger, and can only in the worst emergencies submit to them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. LYON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain JOHN C. KELTON,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.

Numbers 2. Report of Captain Frederick Steele, Second U. S. Infantry.

CAMP NEAR ROLLA, MO., August 18, 1861.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with instructions from headquarters, I have the honor to make the following report in regard to the affair at Dug Springs on the 2nd instant: