War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0909 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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the invading army, which is reported to be on its march towards Lewisburg, which may as probably be directed towards the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, by any of the various routes between that indicated in the valley of the Big Sandy River. You must needs rely upon the arms among the people to supply the requisite armament, and upon their valor and knowledge of the country as a substitute for organization and discipline. If there be any who have arms beyond their power or will to use, you can take them, with such arrangement as the case may indicate for future settlement. As your transportation will of course be very limited, and the service of such character as will indicate the lightest practicable train, the troops must be taught to rely upon the supplies of the country, but not be permitted to take them except through officers authorized for that purpose, and they should be instructed always to make prompt payment, or to give such receipts as will insure early and adequate remuneration. All officers commanding separate parties should be instructed to unite with the greatest vigilance and closest scrutiny the highest regard for the personal and property rights of all with whom they may come in contact, save the common enemy of the State, towards whom the rules of war, as known to civilized nations, will be applied.

The imperfect information possessed od the force and objects of the enemy do not permit specific instructions either as to your line of operations or the movements to be made. You must exercise a sound discretion, so that all your efforts may tend to the result of repelling the enemy if possible, and if not, of checking him as near the border of our territory as may be practicable. If the disparity of numbers should be very great, your defensive positions will for the present necessarily be retired to the mountain passes, and sorties against the enemy should always be so made as to embarrass and delay his movements without hazarding the loss of detachments from your command, teaching them to wait until you have the means to strike a blow which shall be effective. The several officers of experience who have been directed to report to you will be assigned by you to such duties as the necessities of the case may require.

General Floyd, who was been appointed a brigadier-general, has been specially charged with the protection of the line of the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. It may well occur that a junction of your forces may become desirable, in which event each should exhibit his letters of instructions to the other, so that you may cordially co-operate to attain the common object of both. In the event of such a junction, and whilst serving together, General Floyd, being senior by commission, will, according to the Rules and Articles of War, command the whole.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

JUNE 10, 1861.

P. S.-Such volunteers as may be engaged for your command and sent forward to Lewisburg within the next twenty days will be there mustered into service by companies and their transportation paid to that point, it being understood that these volunteers are not to be taken from any of the organized regiments or companies now in the service of the Confederate States.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.