War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0780 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

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ALEXANDRIA, VA., April 25, 1861-2 p. m.

General ROBERT E. LEE:

The following dispatches, this moment, by the hands of a courier, who received them in person from Daniel Clarke himself, which Daniel Clarke, I am assured here by reliable persons, is the son-in-law of Ex-Governor Pratt:

UPPER MARLBOROUGH, MD., April 25, 1861.

General STEUART, Commander of the Virginia Forces at Alexandria, Va.:

Accompanying I send you the latest intelligence, brought by me from Annapolis, which is authentic, reliable, and gathered from the best sources. It is desirable to telegraph the news to the South immediately, and to the Cabinet of the Southern Confederacy. In telegraphing to the Southern Cabinet at Montgomery please send the accompanying dispatch, annexed, to Honorable J. P. Benjamin. I am well know to him, and the intelligence would be known by him to be authentic, coming from me direct from Governor Pratt, Annapolis.

Your, truly, &c.,

DANIEL CLARKE.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN, Montgomery, Ala.:

The dispatched dated Annapolis, April 24th, 6 o'clock, are reliable and authentic, having been brought by me from Governor Pratt.

DANIEL CLARKE.

ANNAPOLIS, MD., April 24, 1861-6 p. m.

The Northern troops have taken forcible possession of the navy-yard and the depot and railroad. This morning two thousand troops left here for Washington, via the railroad. The track, which was torn up, has been railed by the troops. Twelve thousand more troops have just arrived by steamers and war vessels from New York. A portion of the troops, which have just arrived, are now leaving for Washington. Twenty-five or thirty thousand troops are expected to be sent to Maryland by Monday next. A join movement of the forces from Annapolis and Pennsylvania is contemplated upon Baltimore, against which city the Northerners swear vengeance. The city is alive and making preparations against the attack. The Northern forces intend to hold Annapolis as a military post, at which to land the troops, ammunition, and provisions for Washington. Governor Hicks, in consequence of the military occupation of Annapolis, has been forced to convene the legislature at Frederick City. It is thought the legislature will pass an ordinance of secession at once. The people are in arms, and determined to unite in the cause of the South. Prompt and immediate action of the Southern forces for the relief of Maryland is absolutely necessary to prevent the military occupation of the State by the Federal forces.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,

Brigadier-General.

ALEXANDRIA, VA., April 26, 1861.

General LEE, Commander-in-Chief:

The two 8-inch columbiads have arrived, and, there being four rifled cannon at Aquia, under Captain Walker, I shall proceed first to remove or destroy the light boats and the buoys on the Potomac, and, at the same time order General Ruggles to hold himself in readiness to support by sufficient detachment of his troops. I shall do the same from this point, to cover and protect any working party, under the direction of the engineer, at a certain point on the Potomac. I would be glad to have Lieutenant Lee, of the Engineers, or some other officer of the Engineers, assigned for immediate service, to direct the construction of the works of this enterprise.

PHILIP ST. GEO. COCKE,

Brigadier-General.