War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0768 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

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commanding officer agreed in the necessity of this movement. We here have also good opportunity to organize and discipline our forces.

I have thus stated our position fully, that you may be enabled to change it as the public interest may require. With our increasing forces we shall be able to execute any orders that the Commander-in-Chief may desire at once. I do not apprehend attack immediately, but we are readiness.

Captain Reynolds, of the Rhode Island Battery, reached us this morning with his men. Captain Tompkins will be at once relieved. We need very much another rifled gun for Major Doubleday's battery, in return for which we can send, if necessary, one of the 24-pounder guns.

We have no reliable news of the advance of the rebels. There are some five thousand militia at Winchester, with the sick left by Johnston. Indications of movements in the direction of Leesburg seem more important, but yet not decided.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

NATH. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, July 29, 1861.

Captain G. STONEMAN:

SIR: In conformity with your request, I transmit an informal statement of the present condition of the artillery south of the Potomac.

Fort Corcoran, above arlington, with its two redoubts, has an armament of twelve 8-inch sea-coast howitzers, seven 24-pounder barbette guns, two 12-pounder field guns, and two 24-pounder howitzers. About two hundred light artillerists, under Captains Carlisle and Ayres, are at these works; also the German regiment (De Kalb), which has in its ranks many artillerists.

Fort Albany, on the Fairfax road, has eighteen guns, of various caliber (twelve being 24-pounders), Griffin's and Edwards' companies light artillery many artillerists.

Fort Albany, on the Fairfax road, has eighteen guns, of various caliber (twelve being 24-pounders), Griffin's and Edwards' companies light artillery, and a Massachusetts regiment.

Fort Runyon, at the forks of the Alexandria and Fairfax roads (end of Long Bridge), one 30-pounder Parrott rifled gun, eight 8-inch seacoast howitzers, ten 32-pounders, and four 6-pounder field guns. Garrison-Colonel Rogers' Twenty-fifth New York; artillery officer in charge-Captain Seymour, Fifth Artillery.

Fort ellsworth, Alexandria, two 30-pounder and two 10-pounder Parrott rifles, twelve 8-inch sea-coast howitzers, four 24-pounder siege guns, one 24-pounder field howitzer, three 6-pounder guns. Garrison-Captain Arnold's light company, one hundred and twenty men, and Seventeenth New York, Colonel Lansing.

The supply of ammunition for these forts, although not complete, is sufficient for an emergency, averaging about one hundred rounds per gun, and the amount is being increased as rapidly as possible.

The field batteries are in a very unsatisfactory condition, many of them, but as fast as the materials can be procured they are refitting.

Platt has four light 12-pounders, 107 men, in good condition; Tidball has two 6-pounders, two 12-pounder howitzers, 127 men, in good condition; Greene has four Parrott 10-pounders, rifled, 130 men, in good condition; Greene has four Parrott 10-pounders, rifled, 130 men, in good condition: Carlisle has 100 men, no guns; Arnold has 120 men, no guns; Ayres has two 6-pounders, two 12-pounder howitzers, 120 men; Ed-