War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0735 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HAGERSTOWN, MD., June 30, 1861.

General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN,

Grafton, Va.:

I have forwarded you telegram on the subject of the two regiments Pennsylvania State troops to General McCall. I rejoice to hear of your intention to move forward. To-morrow I will feel the enemy on the other side of the Potomac. He is reported to be there in force.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

DOWNSVILLE, MD., June 30, 1861.

Colonel TOWNSEND,

Asst. Adjt. General, U. S. Army, Washington City;

I corss at daylight to-morrow morning.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HARRISBURG, Sunday, June 30, 1861.

[GENERAL PATTERSON:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: On my return from Pittsburg this morning I find your note of the 26th instant, informing me of you purpose to cross the river and offer battle to the insurgents, and asking what force I can throw forward upon the Pennsylvania line.

In reply I have to say that the only force (one regiment rifles and one infantry, with a section of artillery) of my command as yet armed and equipped has been pushed forward to the support of Colonel Wallace at Cumberland and for the protection of our border settlers in that direction; the other regiments are without clothing, arms, or equipments still, notwithstanding my efforts to fit them for the field. You will therefore perceive how impossible it will be for me, although I much regret it, to comply with your request.

With great regard, very truly, yours,

GEORGE A. McCALL.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA, Fort Monroe, July 3, 1861.

Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

SIR: I have the honor to report that yesterday my scouts captured an enemy's picket about five miles from Newport News, and from letters found at their quarters it appears that General Magruder left Yorktown on Tuesday last with the intention of attacking the post at Newport News; that he advanced within three miles of the News without baggage tents, or trains, and stopped overnight on the road near the site of Little Bethel, and in the midst of a drenching rain. He had with him two regiments of Caroline troops, a regiment of Louisiana zouaves, a howitzer battalion from Richmond, and some two hundred or two hundred and fifty horsemen. After advancing so as to be almost within reach of our pickets at Newport New he changed his course up the James River, and was yesterday encamped at Young's Mills, between eleven and twelve miles from Newport News, near Mulberry Point.

Acting in consultation with my engineers, I have advanced the two