War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0707 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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at Washington as to prevent my being supplied. I also desire to call his attention to the fact that I have great need of mounted men for outpost service and vedettes. A company or two would be of great service. I have as yet received no horses for my light battery. I have the harness and guns, and could provide the men if I had the horses. I was reduced to the necessity of sending my own saddle-horse to Big Bethel, to endeavor to convey orders nine miles from my camp, that being the only horse not on duty away form the forts which had a saddle, and those horses were my own personal property. If the exigencies of the service will permit, it will bee of great advantage that I should receive some aid in this matter.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HAGERSTOWN, June 19, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Headquarters of the Army:

I move to-day to occupy early to-morrow the Maryland Heights and shore opposite Harper's Ferry. am I permitted to retain cavalry, as asked for yesterday?

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HAGERSTOWN, June 19, 1861-12.15 p. m.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND:

Your message of 9.15 p. m. of 18th just received-12.15 p. m. The enemy is dotted between Martinsburg and Winchester; main force at Bunker Hill. Thinking your demand for regulars imperative, and as I could not hold the bend to Falling Waters without regular horse, foot, and guns, I withdrew to this side and sent Miles to you. I now hold ford at Williamsport, protected by a gun of Doubleday's battery, &c., under Cadwalader. I occupy Maryland Heights to-morrow morning with guns and infantry to protect bridge-builders. With bridge secured, propose to occupy Harper's Ferry, fortify it toward Winchester; throw everything into Harper' Ferry. Troops and supplies ready to advance towards Winchester or to connect with you. My proposition is given in a letter to you of last night. Shall I carry out this plan? I shall move with caution and security. I hold Thomas subject to your call, wishing to retain him.

R. PATTERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HAGERSTOWN, June 19, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Headquarters of the Army:

After receiving assurances that the bridge over the Potomac at Harper's Ferry would be rebuilt, I arranged to protect laborers and brigade. The company now will not act unless the whole [road] to Cumberland be guarded, saying all the line is threatened if they commence rebuilding Harper's Ferry Bridge or any other structure thence to Cumberland.