War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0699 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HAGERSTOWN, MD., June 17, 1861.

General NEGLEY, Hagerstown, Md.:

GENERAL: Send Colonel Starkweather to Williamsport to report to General Cadwalader at daybreak or earlier. Leave a guard in camp. Take forty rounds of cartridges. Send pickets well in advance. Hold your two regiments (Johnston's and Oakford's) ready, and march with them in time to be within reach of General Cadwalader at daybreak. Give your men forty rounds, and take care to keep them together, and not to fire except by order, lest they fire into their own friends.

By order of General Patterson:

F. J. PORTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-Have the Connecticut regiment and Jarrett's ready to move at daybreak.

HAGERSTOWN, MD., June 17, 1861.

General WYNKOOP, Commanding Second Brigade:

GENERAL: Have your command under arms and en route to Williamsport on the cross-road from Funkstown to Williamsport road by daybreak. On arrival report to General Cadwalader. Take every precaution for your men not to fire without orders, lest they injure their friends. Supply them with forty rounds of ammunition. Procure a guide. Leave a guard with your camp. Be careful and not be surprised.

By order of General Patterson:

F. J. PORTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-Have out your pickets.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF ANNAPOLIS,

Fort McHenry, Md., June 17, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. General U. S. Army:

SIR: Major-General Banks, commanding the Department of Annapolis, directs me to state, for the information of the General-in-Chief, that he has moved the Thirteenth Regiment New York State troops,

Colonel Abel Smith commanding, from Annapolis; Major Cook's battery of light artillery, Massachusetts volunteers, from the Relay House, and the Twenty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Turner G. Morehead commanding, from Patterson Park, Baltimore, to a camp in the outskirts of Baltimore, near the Washington and Baltimore Railroad. He thinks that the partial concentration of the troops in the vicinity of Baltimore will exercise an important moral effect upon the disaffected inhabitants of the city, besides giving him the opportunity of promptly forwarding any of his command who may in future be needed in the Department of Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.