War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0642 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

Search Civil War Official Records

Cadwalader may release Winans-probably will. You must guard against that.

If my services are no longer desired by the Department, I am quite content to be relieved altogether, but I will not be disgraced. In all I have done I have acted solely according to what I believed to be the wishes of the President, General Scott, and yourself.

I am not disposed to be troublesome to you, but I wish this matter might be laid before the President. To be relieved of a command of a department and sent to command a fort, without a word of comment, is something unusual at least, and I am so poor a soldier as not to understand it otherwise than in the light of a reproof.

At least, I desire a personal interview with you and with the President before I accept further service. This will be handed you by my friend and aide-de-camp, R. S. Fay, jr., who knows its contents, and is able to represent me fully to you.

Very truly, yours,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

NAVY-YARD, WASHINGTON, D. C.,

May 18, 1861.

Honorable W. H. SEWARD:

The Anacostia is just in and reports a battery at Aquia Creek, Four guns, and one of heavy caliber. Work not completed. About two hundred men on it.

JNO. A. DAHLGREN,

Commander.

CINCINNATI, May 20, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON:

Important to occupy Cumberland at once. Advices indicate movement through it on Western Virginia to influence election. Occupation of Cumberland will stop the movement. I hope Ohio contingent will not be limited to nine regiments-be brought up to twenty. I have as yet received neither instructions nor authority. My hands tied until I have one or the other. Every day of importance.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Philadelphia, Pa., May 21, 1861.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army:

COLONEL: In the absence of General Patterson I forward the accompanying report of the capture of parties engaged in the burning of bridges. I suggested to Colonel Dare that he should ascertain if the civil authorities in the district where the offense was committed would take cognizance of these cases, and hold the men by bail to appear in future; if they would do so, to turn them over, first (as I understand they are responsible persons) requiring them to take oath to commit no act of hostility against the United States. If the civil authorities