War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0581 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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STATE OF MARYLAND, EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Annapolis, April 20, 1861.

Honorable S. CAMERON:

SIR: Since I saw you in Washington last I have been in Baltimore City laboring, in conjunction with the mayor of that city, to preserve peace and order, but I regret to say with little success. Up to yesterday there appeared promise, but the outbreak came; the turbulent passions of the riotous clement prevailed; fear for safety became reality; what they had endeavored to conceal, but what was known to us, was no longer concealed, but made manifest; the rebellious element had the control of things. We were arranging and organizing forces to protect the city and preserve order, but want of organization and of arms prevented success. They had arms; they had the principal part of the organized military forces with them, and for us to have made the effort, under the circumstances, would have had the effect to aid the disorderly element. They took possession of the armories, have the arms and ammunition, and I therefore think it prudent to decline (for the present) responding affirmatively to the requisition made by President Lincoln for four regiments of infantry.

With great respect, I am, your obedient servant,

THOS. H. HICKS.

WASHINGTON, April 20, 1861.

Governor HICKS:

I desire to consult with you and the mayor of Baltimore relative to preserving the peace of Maryland. Please come immediately by special train, which you can take at Baltimore; or, if necessary, one can be sent from hence. Answer forthwith.

LINCOLN.

BALTIMORE, April 20, 1861.

To Governor HICKS:

Letter from President and General Scott. No troops to pass through Baltimore, if, as a military force, they can march around. I will answer that every effort will be made to prevent parties leaving the city to molest them, but cannot guarantee against-acts of individuals not organized. Do you approve?

GEO. WM. BROWN.

ANNAPOLIS, April 20, 1861.

To the MAYOR OF BALTIMORE:

Your dispatch received. I hoped they would send no more troops through Maryland, but as we have no right to demand that, I am glad no more are to be sent through Baltimore. I know you will do all in your power to preserve the peace.

THOS. H. HICKS.

BALTIMORE, MD., April 20, 1861.

To President LINCOLN:

Every effort will be made to prevent parties leaving the city to molest