War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0577 Chapter IX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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position. When this is completed, unless otherwise directed, I expect to occupy Harrod's and Young's Mills, from which points I can best with safety operate against marauding parties.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. JOHNSTON,

Colonel of Cavalry.

Major G. B. COSBY, A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. Army of Yorktown.

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MARYLAND, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, AND WEST VIRGINIA FROM APRIL 16 TO JULY 31, 1861.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

P., W. AND B. R. R. CO., Philadelphia, April 16, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON:

DEAR SIR: I have received from our agent at Baltimore the following:

BALTIMORE, April 16, 1861.

Mr. WM. CRAWFORD:

DEAR SIR: Is it true as stated that an attempt will be made to pass the volunteers from New York intended to war upon the South over your road to-day? It is important that we have an explicit understanding on the subject.

Your friend,

GEO. P. KANE.

APRIL 16, 1861.

S. M. FELTON, Esq.:

DEAR SIR: The above is from our marshal of police. I have replied that I have no knowledge of anything of the kind. It is rumored that the marshal has issued orders to his force not to permit any forces to pass through the city.

Yours, truly,

WM. CRAWFORD.

I sent you the foregoing, thinking it important you should know of the communication, in order that you may ascertain the facts.

Yours, truly,

S. M. FELTON.

WASHINGTON, April 18, 1861.

To his Excellency THOS. H. HICKS, Governor of Maryland:

SIR: The President is informed that threats are made, and measures taken, by unlawful combinations of misguided citizens of Maryland to prevent by force the transit of United States troops across Maryland, on their way, pursuant to orders, to the defense of this capital. The information is from such sources and in such shape that the President thinks it his duty to make it known to you, so that all loyal and patriotic citizens of your State may be warned in time, and that you may be prepared to take immediate and effective measures against it.

Such an attempt could have only the most deplorable consequences; and it would be as agreeable to the President as it would be to yourself that it should be prevented or overcome by the loyal authorities and citizens of Maryland, rather than averted by any other means.

I am, very respectfully, yours, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

37 R R-VOL II