War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0573 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

refusing to permit them to go in. Here I lost a horse, but have since recovered him, slightly wounded in the foot. Here, by order of General Johnston, I was successfully engaged for two hours in rallying stragglers from infantry commands and sending them to him, who reformed them under the hill below Lewis' house.

When the order for the pursuit was given I was in advance of the main body of the cavalry, and started off with Colonel Chesnut, with orders, however, to report to General Beauregard. Before reaching the Warrenton turnpike, below Fairfax House, not finding the general, and learning that he was on [the] other side of the run road, I asked permission to go on, which was granted by Colonel Chesnut, he stating his purpose to accompany me. We were starting upon the main road to Centreville, when a messenger from the adjutant-general ordered me to the left, to disperse a body then apparently forming, but which proved to be of our own men. From this point I advanced beyond the ford at Sudley, taking and paroling prisoners and aiding Colonel Jordan in caring for the wounded at or near that point, and with his returned to camp with men and horses much wearied and exhausted.

I lost no men from my command. One horse, while his rider, acting as guide to a battery, was taking down a fence, was struck by a shell and instantly killed. Two others, while on active courier duty, died from heat and exhaustion; others are permanently injured, I fear.

In conclusion, my officers and men were cool and composed, ready promptly to obey all orders; most of them under fire repeatedly during the day; some of them constantly with the general in his exposure, and with his aide, Colonel Chisolm. I had no opportunity other than to discharge those duties assigned me, which I hope were as efficient as they were cheerfully rendered.

Respectfully,

JOHN F. LAY,

Captain, Commanding Squadron of Cavalry.

Colonel THOMAS JORDAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 124. Report of Captain Edgar Whitehead, Radford's Rangers, of pursuit July 22.

CENTREVILLE, July 28, 1861.

SIR: On the morning of the 22nd instant I was ordered by General Longstreet to accompany Colonel Terry, of Texas, and pursue the enemy, and find out their exact position. On reaching Centreville we found the main body had fled, and we pursued the stragglers, taking twenty-five or thirty prisoners on the route to Fairfax Court-House, where Colonel Terry shot down the United States flag and placed the stars and bars on the top on the court-house. The large flag sent back by him was intended, we learned, to be put at Manassas. Another was taken from the court-house, and the third one, to which you probably refer, was taken from some soldier by Private R. L. Davies, of my company, who had it in a haversack-no doubt to be raised on the first captured battery taken. It had no staff, but was carried carefully wrapped in the haversack.

Very respectfully,

EDGAR WHITEHEAD,

Captain Company E, Radford's Rangers.

Colonel THOMAS JORDAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Manassas.

For particulars in regard to horses, wagons, guns, and ready-made clothing, see Colonel Terry's note to General Longstreet.*

---------------

*Not found.

---------------