War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0555 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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teries in the pines opposite, and being ordered forward, was conducted by Captain Harris to a position in front of the enemy, upon the eastern verge of the plateau upon which Mrs. Henry's house is placed, and about six hundred yards distant therefrom, where it was posted, under a heavy fire, supported by Colonel Smith's battalion of infantry. It kept up an effectual fire upon the enemy until its ammunition was also exhausted, when it retired to Lewis', for the purpose of replenishing.

My whole battery then being united, we received your order that we should leave it to the rifled cannon to fire at long range, as the enemy were retreating, and that we must cease firing; after which we were ordered by General Beauregard to Camp Walker, eight miles from the battle-field, below Manassas Junction, with General Elzey's brigade, where we marched that night.

I refer to annexed statements of the casualties of the day.

Casualties.-3 privates wounded, 1 supposed mortally; 2 horses wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARTH. L. ROGERS,

Commanding Loudoun Artillery.

Colonel PHILIP ST. GEORGE COCKE,

Commanding Fifth Brigade.

Numbers 109. Report of Colonel Jubal A. Early, commanding Sixth Brigade, First Corps, Army of the Potomac.

HDQRS. SIXTH Brigadier, FIRST CORPS, ARMY POTOMAC, August 1, 1861.

COLONEL: I submit the following report of the operations of my brigade on the 21st ultimo:

My position on the morning of the 21st was in the pines on the road from Camp Walker to the gate in front of McLean's farm house, to which place my brigade had been removed on the day before from Blackburn's Ford, on Bull Run, where it had been since the action on Thursday, the 18th. The portion of the brigade with me consisted of Colonel Kemper's regiment, Seventh Virginia; Colonel Harry T. Hays' regiment, Seventh Louisiana, and six companies of my own regiment, the Twenty-fourth Virginia.

At an early hour in the morning the enemy's batteries near Blackburn's Ford opened fire, and I received an order from General Beauregard through one of his aides to move my brigade to the cover of the pines between McLean's Ford and the road leading to Blackburn's Ford, so as to be ready to support either General Longstreet or General Jones, as might be necessary. A short time after taking this position I received a request from General Longstreet to send him a regiment, which request I complied with by sending him the six companies of my own regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hairston, and two companies of Colonel Hays' regiment, under Major Penn. I proceeded also to General Longstreet's position at Blackburn's Ford, and after the companies I had sent him were posted as he desired, I returned to the place where the rest of the brigade was, and in a short time received a further request from General Longstreet to furnish him another regiment, which I complied with by carrying him the residue of Hays' regiment.