War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0554 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

Search Civil War Official Records

pearing upon the brow of the hill a little to the right of our front, and distant about seven hundred yards. I continued this fire, and aided in checking the advance of the enemy, who were driven back from this point in disorder. I moved my battery about three hundred yards to the right, and continued to fire upon the retreat until the charge of our cavalry, near the close of the battle, rendered it no longer safe to our troops to do so.

For the action of my second section I must refer to the report of General Evans, to whose command they had been assigned, and with whom they acted during the battle. I feel it a duty to speak in terms of high approval of my command during the engagement. My lieutenant (Foukes) and my gunners (Richardson and Rice) rendered most efficient service. The men served the guns with spirit and skill. We endeavored to do our duty, leaving to others to attribute to us such commendations as we may deserve.

I cannot refrain from expressing my admiration of the skill and coolness with which Captain Harris, of the Engineers, selected and led men into position, and tender him my thanks for the kindness and courtesy with which he introduced me to my first field of actual service.

I annex a report of the casualties of the day:

Casualties.-1 man wounded; 1 horse killed, 3 wounded.

Respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. GREY LATHAM,

Captain, Artillery.

Colonel P. ST. GEORGE COCKE,

Commanding Fifth Brigade, Virginia Volunteers.

Numbers 108. Report of Captain Arthur L. Rogers, Loudoun Artillery.

SIR: I have the honor to report that the first section of Loudoun Artillery, under my immediate command, was on the day of the battle of Manassas held in reserve until about 10 o'clock a. m., when by your order I proceeded to the crest of the hill on the west side of Bull Run, commanding stone bridge, from which Latham's half battery had been withdrawn by Major Evans, to resist the enemy's attack in front of our forces. Here I posted my section of artillery, and opened a brisk fire upon a column of the enemy's infantry, supposed to be two regiments, advancing towards me, and supported by his battery of rifled cannon on the hills opposite. These poured into my section a steady fire of shot and shell. After giving them some fifty rounds I succeeded in heading his column, and turned it up Bull Run to a ford about one mile above stone bridge, where, with the regiments which followed, they crossed, and proceeded to join the rest of the enemy's forces in front of the main body of our army. After having exhausted my ammunition I retired, with a section of the Louisiana Washington Artillery posted in my rear, to Lewis' house, to replenish my limber-boxes, having no caisson with my section and being supported by but a small force of infantry. By the time I had procured more ammunition the enemy's fire ceased upon the right wing of the Army, upon which we were engaged.

The other section of my battery, under command of Lieutenant Heaton, was posted by Captain Harris, of the Engineers, on the west bank of Bull Run, on a bluff, where it assisted in silencing the enemy's bat-