War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0548 Chapter IX. OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA.

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out of sight. My regiment was then ordered by General Beauregard to push for the turnpike at stone bridge and cut off, if possible, the retreating enemy at that point. We reached the run and crossed it just below the cut timber east of the stone bridge, and entered the turnpike road just beyond that point. The enemy, however, had retreated by the Sundley's Mill and other points above.

Soon after we crossed the run we were joined by two South Carolina regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Kershaw and Cash, and together we pursued the enemy along the turnpike road in the direction of Centreville, until I was recalled by an order to fall back to stone bridge. Before reaching the point we designed to occupy we were met by other order to march immediately to Manassas Junction, as an attack was apprehended that night. Although it was after sunset, and my men had no food all day, when the command to march to Manassas was given they cheerfully took the route to that place. On arriving in the immediate neigh told to that place I was directed to carry my command to Camp Walker, a mile or two below. This place we reached late at night, and our wearied men threw themselves on the ground and slept till morning. On the 22nd we were order back to our formed position on Bull Run, and the next day to the position we now occupy, near suspension bridge, on Cub Run.

Too much praise cannot be awarded to the Eighteenth Regiment for their conduct during the memorable action of the 21st. officers and men, with one or two individual exceptions, exhibited the utmost coolness and determined bravery. The last charge made by them was most brilliant and successful, and enabled us to retain possession of their cannon. i believe these pieces had been captured once or twice before during the action, but claim for the Eighteenth the honor of holding the guns and turnpike them upon the enemy.

During the action Lieutenant-Colonel Carrington and Major Cabell rendered efficient and valuable service, as did Adjutant Withers and all the staff officers. Indeed, the officers generally displayed so much valor and determination that it would be invidious to draw distinctions.

The whole command, indeed, exhibited a steadiness under fire remarkable for raw troops.

Considering the length of time we were under fire our loss was very small not very seriously. No other commissioned officer was hurt.

I would respectfully mention the necessity that exists for supplying many of the men with knapsacks, blankets, &c. As they advanced into battle, by my orders they threw away everything except their guns and ammunition, and having subsequently marched to Camp Walker the same night, they had no opportunity of getting their clothing and blankets again.

I would also request that those of my companies who are now armed with the smooth-bore altered musket may be permitted to exchange them for the more efficient Enfield or minie gun.

With much respect, I am, your most obedient servant,

R. E. WITHERS,

Colonel Eighteenth Regiment Virginia Volunteers.

Colonel PHILIP ST. GEORGE COCKE,

Commanding Fifth Brigade, Virginia Volunteers.

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* Which shows 5 killed, 16 wounded, and 1 missing.

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