War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0547 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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speedily a possible. We moved forward in double-quick time, and soon came under fire of the enemy's battery about Lewis' house. Contusing to advance beyond the house, I was ordered by General Beauregard to conduct my regiment obliquely to the left and attack the center of the enemy. On approaching their position I found a pretty strong force posed in a thicket of pines, in some places almost impenetrable. Which a cheer we dashed into the thicket and pushed forward, the enemy retiring as we advanced.

They were composed principally of the Fourteenth New York Chasseurs, and several of their number were killed and captured by the left wing of my regiment. Emerging from the pines I halted and reformed the regiment, which had been thrown into some disorder whilst advancing through the pines. I now found myself exposed to hot fire of musketry, and could not clearly distinguish friends from foes. Ordering my men to lie down in a slight depression of the field, so as to protect them as far as possible, I rode to the left of the line, and after some trouble was enabled to discover the U. S. flag with about two regiments on a hill opposite our position and across the Sundley road. A pretty sharp fire at long range kept up between these troops and my command for some time. Just at this time a number of troops to my right, whim had been stationed around an old house (Mrs. Henry's), fell back in a good deal confusion, but rallied as soon as they passed my line. One of the captains came up, and, announcing that they consistuted a part of the Hampton Legion, and had no field officers left to take charge of them, as their colonel was wounded and lieutenant-colonel killed, desired to know what they should do. I directed them to form on the right of my regiment, which they did with promptness. I was then told that they had they been forced back a battery which they had taken from the enemy, but which they seemed determined to regain, as their skirmishers had advance very nearly to the guns, supported by a heavy force of infantry. I ordered the whole regiment to charge, which they did in beautiful style, driving back the enemy (not only the skirmishers, but the supporting infantry) beyond the hill.

This battery consisted of eight rifled cannon, and I was told constituted a part of the celebrated Sherman battery. They were posted between Mrs. Henry's house and the Sudley road, in a little triangular plat of grass land. It was immediately proposed to turn their guns on them. I ordered the two rear companies of my command, Company I and Company K, to drag the guns into proper position. they immediately brought up two of the guns and ammunition. Captain Claiborne brought up two of the guns and ammunition. Captain Claiborne, of Company B, Adjutant Withers, and Lieutenant Shield, of Company E, assisted by a gallant South Carolina officer, afterwards understood to be Green, and several others, soon loaded one of the pieces, and brought it to upon a large number of men who were congregated near a two story house beyond the turnpike. Just as we were about to fire I discovered among them the Confederate flag, and ordered them not to fire. I know in this I am not mistaken, as it was first recognized by the naked eye, and an examination with a good field glass confirmed my first opinion. Whilst debating the question amongst ourselves I saw two other bodies of troops passing up the hill towards the house, amongst whom the U. S. flag was clearly visible. They joined the party first seen, and proving thus that they were enemies and had raised our flag with the intention of deceiving us, we no longer hesitated to open fire upon them their own cannon.

The South Carolinian alluded to above fired the fiesta gun, and a most effective one it seemed to be. A few shots sufficed to drive all the enemy