War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0543 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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its members, having become separated from the company, with Sergeant Blassingame, joined us.

Numbers 100. Report of Brigadier General James Longstreet, C. S. Army, commanding Fourth Brigade, First Corps.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH BRIGADE, July 28, 1861

In obedience to the general's orders of the 20th to assume the offensive, my command was moved across Bull Run at an early hour on the 21st. I found my troops much exposed to the fire of the enemy's artillery, my front being particularly exposed to a double cross-fire as well as a direct one. Garland's regiment, Eleventh Virginia, was placed in position to carry by assault the battery immediately in my front. McRae's regiment, Fifth North Carolina, under Lieutenant-Colonel Jones, the colonel being sick, was posted in front of the battery on my right, and with same purpose in regard to this battery. Strong bodies of skirmishers were thrown out in front of each column, with orders to lead in the assault, and at the same time to keep up a sharp fire, so as to confuse as much as possible the fire of the enemy, and thereby protect the columns were to be supported, the first by the First Virginia Regiment, under Major Skinnes, the second by the Seventeenth Virginia Regiment, under Colonel Corse. The Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiment, under Colonel Hairston, was the reserve in column of division in mass, convenient to the support of either column. Arrangements being complete to troops were ordered to lie down and cover themselves from the artillery fire as much as possible.

About an hour after my position was taken it was discovered by a reconnaissance made by Colonels Terry and Lubbock that the enemy was moving in heavy columns towards our left, the position that the general had always supposed he would take. This information was at once sent to headquarters, and I soon received orders to fall back upon my original position, the right bank of the run. Colonels Terry and Lubbock then volunteered to make a reconnaissance of the enemy's batteries. They made a very gallant and complete one, and a hasty sketch of his entire left. This information was forwarded to the commanding general, with the suggestion that the batteries be taken.

The general's orders were promptly issued to that effect, and I again moved across the run, but some of the troops ordered to co-operate failed to get their orders. After awaiting the movement some time, I received a peculiar order to hole my position only. In a few minutes however, the enemy were reported routed, and I was again ordered forward. The troops were again moved across the run and advanced towards Centreville, the Fifth North Carolina Regiment being left to hold the ford. Advancing to the routed column I had the First, Eleventh, Seventeenth, and Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiments, Garnett's section of the Washington Artillery, and Whichead's troop of cavalry. The artillery and cavalry were at once put in pursuit, followed as rapidly as possible by the infantry.

General Bonham, who was pursuing on our left, finding it difficult to advance through the, &c., moved his command to the road, put