War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0538 Chapter IX. OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA.

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In the execution to these orders the two Mississippi regiments of my brigade, while advancing to recross McLean's Ford, were exposed to a dangerous and demoralizing fire of rifle shot and shell from the enemy's batteries, placed at or near Grigsby's barn. Upon reaching my intrenchments General Ewell sent me an order he had received from General Beauregard, upon which was the following indorsement, viz:

The general says this is the only order ho has received. It implies he is to receive another. Send this to General Beauregard if you think proper.

FITZ. LEE

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Shortly after this I was requested by General Longstreet to make a demonstration in this favor on my front, followed by an order from General Beauregard, borne by Mr. Terry, 11.30 a. m., to advance upon the enemy up Rocky Run, co-operating with General Eweel on my right and General Longstreet on my left.

I recrossed the ford, my men much fatigued by the morning's march, many just convalescing from the measles, and retraced my route to the position I had occupied in the morning, and thence endeavored to communicate with General Ewell. Failing in this, I notified General Longstreet that I was advancing to the assault, and proceeded westwardly through the woods to the eastern elevation of Rocky Run Valley. My regiments were pushed forward by a flank movement through a ravine in the northeastern corner of Croson's field, with instructions to from into line after crossing the follow in the following order, viz: Colonel Jenkins, Fifth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, on the right, his right wing resting on the woods; Colonel Burt, Eighteenth Regiment Mississippi Volunteers, supporting my artillery, protected by a company of infantry and Captain Flood's small troop of cavalry, to be posted on the brow of a hill well to the left-the only point from which it could be used at all-in order to distract the enemy's fire from my advancing lines of infantry. This arrangement of my two pieces of artillery, I regret to state, was impracticable, by a vigorous converging fire from the enemy's filed guns and an advance of his infantry before my infantry company could be thrown forward to protect the pieces, and I was compelled to withdraw them.

Colonel Jenkin's regiment advanced through a galling fire and over exceeding difficult ground across the hollow. The Mississippi regiment followed, but to the great difficulties of the ground, which were not apparent in my reconnaissance, and to the murderous shower of the shot, shell, and canister which was poured upon the brigade from a masked battery, as well as from that in front, faltered, and with the exception of Captain Fontaine's company, fell back. I rallied them in the woods to the rear at a point to which I had previously withdrawn the artillery and cavalry. While the Eighteenth Mississippi Regiments was endeavoring to from into line its right became lapped behind the left of the Fifth, upon which its fire told fatal effect. The latter regiment (the Fifth), notwithstanding the heavy fire of the enemy in front and the unfortunate fire of friends in the rear, advanced to the opposite slope, and then formed into line of battle, prepared to make the charger. Being isolated by the falling back of the supporting regiments it maintained its position for nearly three-quarters of an hour, its two right companies in the mean time thrown into the woods with well-directed volleys, driven the already retreating foe precipitately from the field. After I had dispatched three separate orders to withdraw, there being