War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0518 Chapter IX. OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA.

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positions of great, and promptly and bravely did they each acquit themselves of any duty they were called upon to perform.

I could mention individual instances of bravery and daring on the part of non-commissioned officers and privates would it not be invidious where all behaved so well.

In conclusion, general, I can only say I am gratified to know we have done our duty as we were pledged to do.

With great respect, I am, general, your obedient servant,

J. B. WALTON,

Major, Commanding.

Brigadier General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Division, C. S. Army.

Numbers 86. Report of Brigadier General M. L. Bonham, C. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, First Corps.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FIRST CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp Gregg, August 1, 1861.

GENERAL: I had ordered reports from my officers of the operations of the 21st of July previous to the 1st instant, though I had not until that day placed on my extreme left Kershaw's regiment with Kemper's battery, both to give support to the left or center of your whole line, as circumstances might require, and to keep watch on the enemy's movements, should he attempt to cross any part of his force by Cub Run Ford, between Colonel Cocke's position at stone bridge and my own at Bull Run. Colonel Kirkland's regiment was placed in my center, on the ground previously by Colonel Kershaw. The enemy continued up to evening of the 20th to make some display of force in my front, but to what except it was impossible to ascertain, as his force was under cover of the hills and woods. My command was kept on the alert, and my scouts and pickets kept careful watch on his movements, under the exsection that he was preparing to move directly on my position.

About 2.30 o'clock on the morning of the 21st Colonel Kirkland, field officer of the day for my command, a vigilant officer, came in from visiting his pickets beyond the run and informed me that he had heard the rumbling to my left front of artillery wagons. I directed him to renew his efforts to ascertain its character, and before daylight he confirmed his suspicions that it was the enemy in force, which I communicated to headquarters. I also sent across the run General McGowan, one of my volunteer aides, who brought me the same intelligence. I directed him to report to you in person, and crossing myself (it was now light) to the grove near Butler's house, directly in my front, I received by my field-glass, dimly in the distance, the enemy in large force proceeding along the Warrenton turnpike towards the stone bridge, Colonel Cocke's position. This fact I immediately communicated to headquarters, and directed my whole command to prepare for action, as I supposed the assault would be made early along our whole line.

Early in the morning the enemy's fire was opened upon my position from the batteries in my front, throwing shot and shell rifled cannon, and kept up until the afternoon, with occasional exchanges of small arms between the advance troops. The distance was such that my own