War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0503 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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Franklin's brigade (Gorman's) lost twenty-one per cent., Griffin's (battery) loss was thirty per cent, and that of Kelye's brigade, which was so handled by its commander as to be exposed to only occasional volleys from our troops, was at least ten per cent. To these facts add the repeated references in the reports of the more reticent commanders to the "murdous" fire to which they were habitually exposed, the "pistolrange" volleys, and galling musketry of which they speak as scourging their ranks, and we are warranted in placing the entire loss of the Federalists at over forty-five hundred in killed, wounded, and prisoners. To this may be legitimately added as a casualty of the battle the thousands of fugitives from the field, who have never rejoined their regiments, and are as much lost to the enemy's service as if slain or disabled by wounded. These may not be included under the head of missing, became in every instance of such report we took as many prisoners of those brigades of regiments as are reported missing.

A list appended exhibits some 1,460 of their wounded and others who fell into our hands and were sent to Richmond.* Some were sent to other points, so that the number of prisoners, including wounded who other points, so that the number of prisoners, including wounded who did not die, may be set down as not less than 1,600. Besides * these a considerable number who could not be removed from the field dir at several farm-houses and field hospitals within ten days following the battle.

To serve the future historian of this war I will note the fact that among the captured Federalist are officers and men of forty-seven regiments of volunteers, besides from some nine different regiments of regular troops, detachments of which were engaged. From their official reports we learn of a regiment of volunteers engaged, six regiments of Miles' division, and five regiments of Runyon's brigade, from which we have neither should nor wounded prisoners. Making all allowances for mistakes, we are warranted in saying that the Federal army consisted of at least fifty-five regiments of volunteers, eight companies of regular infantry, four of marines, nine of regular cavalry, and twelve batteries of forty-nine. These regiments at one time, as will appear from a published list appended, marked K, numbered in the aggregate 54,140, and avenge 964 each. From and order of the enemy's commander, however, dated July 13, we learn that one hundred men from each regiment were directed to remain in charge of their respective camps. Some allowance must further be made for the sick and details, which would reduce the advance to eight hundred men. Adding the regular cavalry, infantry, and artillery present, an estimate of their force may be made.+

A paper appended, marked L, exhibits in part the ordnance and supplies captured, including some twenty-eight field pieces of the best character of arm, with over one hundred rounds of ammunition for each gun, thirty-seven caissons, six forages, four battery wagons, sixty-fourth artillery horses completely equipped, 500,000 rounds of small-arms ammunition, 4,500 sets of accouterments, over 500 muskets, some nine regimental and garrison flags, with a large number of pistols, knapsacks, swords canteens, blankets, a large store of axes and entrenching tools, wagons, ambulances, horses, camp and garrison equipage, hospital stores, and some subsistence.

Added to these result may rightly be noticed here that by this battle an invading army, superbly equipped, within twenty miles of their base of operations, has been converted into one virtually and

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* Namely: 3 colonels, 1 major, 13 captains, 36 lieutenants, 5 surgeons, 7 assistant surgeons, 2 chaplains, 15 citizens, and 1,376 enlisted men.

+ Report Numbers 120, post.

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