War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0461 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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of the tents, was because the tents were thrown out of one wagon in order to give room for the many sick men we had.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. RODES,

Colonel, Commanding Fifth Regiment Alabama Volunteers.

Captain FITZHUGH LEE,

Act. Asst. Adjt. General, Second Brigade, Army of the Potomac.

Numbers 75. Report of Brigadier General David R. Jones, C. S. Army, of operations at McLean's Ford.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE,

Camp Pettus, August 3, 1861.

In obedience to instructions conveyed by circular of the 1sth of August, instant, I have the honor to submit the following report of my brigade, at that time composed of the Fifth Carolina Regiment and Seventeenth and Eighteenth Regiments of Mississippi Volunteers, for the 18th day of July, during the battle fought on that day at Blackburn's Ford, on Bull Run:

My command was placed in position at McLean's Ford, on Bull Run, and did not participate in the engagement of that date. The enemy in some force occupied a position on Rocky Run, above one mile and a half in front and to the left of my position, and were prevented from making a nearer reconnaissance of our lines by the vigilance of my pickets, which were kept well in advance.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. R. JONES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Colonel THOMAS JORDAN,

Act. Asst. Adjt. General, First Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Numbers 76. Report of Brigadier General James Longstreet, C. S. Army, of action at Blackburn's Ford.

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to the orders of the general commanding I took my position at this ford on the 17th instant, my brigade being composed of the First, Eleventh, and Seventeenth Regiments of Virginia Volunteers. My line of defense being quite extended, I threw out a line of skirmishers to the water's edge, covering my entire front, holding strong reserves in readiness to defend with the bayonet any point that might be violently attacked.

At 11.30 o'clock a.m. on the 18th my pickets reported the enemy advancing upon the ford in heavy columns of infantry and a strong artillery force. At 12 m. the pickets retired without firing. My artillery (two pieces) were placed in convenient position, with orders to retire the moment it was ascertained that our pieces were commanded by those of the enemy. The first shot from his battery discovered the advantage of