War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0455 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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was received by the Seventh Regiment from any of the shots, nor did anything occur further worthy of mentioning.*

Respectfully submitted.

THOS. G. BACON,

Colonel, Commanding Seventh Regiment S. C. Volunteers.

Brigadier General M. L. BONHAM, Commanding First Brigade, &c.

Numbers 70. Report of Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Henagan, commanding Eighth South Carolina Infantry, of operations July 17 and 18.

HDQRS. EIGHTH REG'T SOUTH CAROLINA VOLS.,

Camp Victory, Vienna, Va., July 29, 1861.

In obedience to General Orders, No.-, from headquarters First Brigade, Army of the Potomac, I ask leave to report the operations of the Eighth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers from the morning of the 17th to the 18th instant, inclusive, during which time, in consequence of the illness of Colonel Cash, the command devolved upon me.

At a very early hour on the morning of the 17th repeated and rapid discharged of artillery and musketry were reported at a distance of from two to three miles to my right. This proved to be an attack by the advance guard of the enemy's columns upon pickets stationed on the Falls Church and Alexandria roads. These pickets having been driven in, orders, from brigade headquarters required me to take position behind the entrenchments which had been thrown up at a distance of three hundred yards in front of my camp on both sides of the road leading from Germantown towards the Flint Hill school-house, and known as the Old Germantown road. A gun from Captain Shileds' howitzer battery had been previously placed in position on the right of this road, and was in charge of Lieutenant McCarthy. For the protection of this piece I there Company G, Captain Harrington, into the trenches on the right, and detailed Company C, Captain Coit, to operate as skirmishers in the woods on the extreme right of the earthworks. Company D, Captain Miller, was deployed at a distance of one hundred and fifty yards in front and on the left of my position. Company A, Captain Hoole, was on picket at a barricade one and a quarter miles in advance, on the Flinch Hill road, and Captain Hough, of Company B, with part of his command, was on picket at a point on the Fox Mill road about one mile to the left of Captain Hoole. The remainder of Company B, under Lieutenant Johnson, was stationed at a stone bridge one and a quarter miles from Germantown, on the Little River turnpike, in the direction of Centreville. These pickets had been placed overnight, and received orders at a very early hour from brigade headquarters to dispute every inch of ground if driven in during the day.

The firing which had been first heard upon the right gradually inclined towards the left, indicating a movement towards my front. A few minutes before 8 o'clock the enemy appeared in large force, advancing upon the barricade behind which Captain Hoole was stationed-his skirmishers beating the woods on both sides and far to the left. Captain Hoole retired upon the nearer approach of the column, and fell back upon the line of skirmishers in my front. The noise of axes at the barricades

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*See report No. 90. post.

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