War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0391 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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any attack. We reached our camp beyond Centreville at 8 p.m. It is but proper to mention that our officers and men were on their feet from 10 p.m. on the 20th until 10 a.m. on the 22nd. Without rest, many without food, foot-sore, and greatly exhausted, they yet bore the retreat cheerfully, and set an example of constancy and discipline worthy of older and more experienced soldiers. My officers, nearly all of them just from civil life and the Military Academy, were eager and zealous, and to their efforts is due the soldierly retreat and safety of the battalion, as well as of many straggling volunteers who accompanied my command. The acting major, Captain N. H. Davis, Second Infantry, rendered essential service by his coolness, zeal, and activity. Captain Dodge, Eighth Infantry, commanding the skirmishers on the left, was equally efficient, and to those gentlemen and all my officers I am indebted for cordial co-operation in all the movements of the day. Lieutenant Kent, although wounded, endeavored to retain command of his company, but a second wound forced him to give it up. He and Lieutenant Dickinson, acting adjutant, wounded, and Dr. Sternberg, U. S. Army, are believed to be in the hands of the enemy.

I beg to call the attention of the brigade commander to the services of Sergeant-Major Devoe, of the Third Infantry, who was conspicuous for his good conduct on the field. The arms and equipments of my command are in good condition, but the men are destitute of blankets, and in want of necessary clothing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE SYKES,

Major, Fourteenth Infantry, Commanding Battalion of U. S. Marines.

MARINE BARRACKS HEADQUARTERS, Washington, July 24, 1861.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report the movements and operations of the battalion of marines under my command detailed to co-operate with the Army.

The battalion left the barracks at headquarters in time to reach the Virginia end of the Potomac Long Bridge at 3 p.m. July 16, and proceeded up the Columbia turnpike until an officer, purporting to be the assistant adjutant-general of Colonel Porter's brigade, came up and assigned us position in the line of march, which placed us immediately in the rear of Captain Griffin's battery of flying artillery. This assignment was continued up to the period of the battle at Bull Run.

On reaching the field, and for some hours previously, the battery's accelerated march was such as to keep my command more or less in double-quick time; consequently the men became fatigued or exhausted in strength. Being obliged at this period to halt, in order to afford those in the rear an opportunity of closing up and taking their proper place in line, the battery was lost to protection from the force under my command. This I stated to Colonel Porter, who was ever present, watching the events of the day. The position of the battery was lost to protection from the force under my command. This I stated to Colonel Porter, who was ever present, watching the events of the day. The position of the battery was