War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0381 Chapter IX. THE BULL RUN CAMPAIGN.

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The first sergeant, Terrence Reily, was very efficient, as were also the chiefs of pieces-Sergeants Smith, Pfeffer, Flood, and Relinger.

A detachment of twenty recruits, under Lieutenant Brisbin, had been dispatched from Carlisle Barracks to fill up my company. Lieutenant Brisbin did not reach Washington until after we had left, but he followed us up, and sought us on the field. He did not succeed in finding the battery, but employed his men usefully in endeavoring to stop the retreat of our forces and in resisting the pursuit of the enemy. In the performance of these duties he was twice wounded. He speaks favorably of the services of Sergeants Bowman and Rogers, of his detachment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY J. HUNT,

Bvt. Major and Captain, Second Artillery, Commanding Lt. Co. M.

Captain J. B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 30. Report of Lieutenant John Edwards, Third U. S. Artillery.

FORT ALBANY, VA., July 27, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report with reference to the part taken by Light Company G, First Artillery, in the late engagement at Bull Run:

At about 5 a.m. on the morning of July 21 I left camp with my battery, consisting of two 20-pounder rifled cannon, and proceeded to the camp of Colonel Richardson. By his order was halted on the road about two hours. At the expiration of that time Colonel Davies, who was accompanied by Colonel Richardson, directed me to follow them with my guns. The general direction of the road taken was southeasterly, and winding through a heavily-timbered country. After a march of a mile, came to an open space on the brow of a range of high hills. This seemed to be a position on the extreme left of the line, and from it there was aa good view of the valley of Bull Run and the wooded heights beyond. I was directed to open fire upon a white house in front, partially concealed by trees, and from which a secession flag was flying. The distance was about 2,000 yards. Immediately after the firing of the first shell a flight of men, wagons, and horses took place from that locale. The direction of their flight was up the ridge to the left. Their speed being hastened by other shots, they soon disappeared in the forests. About a half hour thereafter large bodies of troops debouched from the woods at the same point where those who fled had disappeared. They marched across an open space some three miles from my position, and were then lost to sight in the woods, but the direction of their march could be traced by the dust.

Near the summit of the chain of hills, on the opposite side, a large brick house could be seen by the aid of a glass. Towards this these troops moved. By columns of dust thrown up on the right troops were judged to be approaching this direction also. This house on the summit must have been a central rallying point. I kept up an irregular fire from my guns, dropping shell occasionally into the wooded ravines below us and throwing solid shot and shell at columns of dust within range raised be rebel troops. My position being somewhat exposed,