War of the Rebellion: Serial 002 Page 0368 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W.VA. Chapter IX.

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position we could not come into action. Our cannoneers and drivers were shot or sobered. While moving at a gallop our wheels came off of each piece in my section. Our efforts to repair this damage were unavailing, and amidst a shower of pistol bullets we dragged our pieces until the traces broke. The men and non-commissioned officers behaved with gallantry. I halted at Centreville and attempted to join my brigade, but unsuccessfully. Learning that the regiments of the brigade were marching to Fairfax Court-House, I followed them with as many men and non-commissioned officers of my company as I could collect. An order being issued after this for the troops to retire to Washington, I proceeded with a sergeant, four enlisted men, and five horses to Fort Corcoran, where the baggage of the company was stored, and arrived there about 8 o'clock Monday morning.

Very respectfully,

WILLIAM D. FULLER,

Brevet Second Lieutenant, Third Artillery.

Captain J. HOWARD CARLISLE,

Commanding Company E, Second Artillery.

No. 25. Report of Colonel William T. Sherman, Thirteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, First Division.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, Fort Corcoran, July 25, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit this my report of the operations of my brigade during the action of the 21 instant. The brigade is composed of the Thirteenth New York Volunteers, Colonel Quinby; Sixty-ninth New York, Colonel Corcoran; Seventy-ninth New York, Colonel Cameron; Second Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Peck, and Company E, Third Artillery, under command of Captain R. B. Ayres, Fifth Artillery.

We left our camp near Centreville, pursuant to orders, at 2.30 a.m., taking place in your column next to the brigade of General Schenck, and proceeded as far as the halt before the enemy's position near the stone bridge at Bull Run. Here the brigade was deployed in line along the skirt of timber, and remained quietly in position till after 10 a.m. The enemy remained very quiet, but about that time we saw a regiment. The enemy remained very quiet, but about that time we saw a regiment leave its cover in our front and proceed in double-quick time on the road Sudley Springs, by which we knew the columns of Colonels Hunter and Heintzelman were approaching. About the same time we observed in motion a large force of the enemy below the stone bridge. I directed Captain Ayres to take position with his battery near our right and open fire on this mass, but you had previously detached the two rifled guns belonging to this battery, and finding the smooth-bore guns did not reach the enemy's position we ceased firing, and I sent a request that you should send to me the 30-pounder rifled gun attached to Captain Carlisle's battery. At the same time I shifted the New York Sixty-ninth to the extreme right of the brigade.

Thus we remained till we heard the musketry fire across Bull Run, showing that the head of Colonel Hunter's column was engaged. This firing was brisk, and showed that Hunter was driving before him the